Battery light stays on but runs fine?? - Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars
Ford Forum Ford Forum

» Auto Insurance
» Featured Product
ยป Wheel & Tire Center

Go Back   Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars > Ford Trucks | Utes | Vans |SUVs | Crossovers > Ford Vans and Mini Vans | Ford Aerostar | Ford Freestar | Ford Galaxy | Ford Windstar
Register Home Forum Active Topics Photo Gallery Auto Loans Garage Mark Forums Read Auto Escrow

Ford Vans and Mini Vans | Ford Aerostar | Ford Freestar | Ford Galaxy | Ford Windstar Forum for discussion of all Ford Vans and Ford Mini Vans such as the Ford Aerostar and Ford Freestar.

FordForums.com is the premier Ford Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-07-2011, 11:06   #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3
Battery light stays on but runs fine??

Hi i tried searching this problem but couldnt find anything on here so im not sure if this has been answered before,,i have a 99 windstar with the 3.8l,i bought the van 1 week ago runs good the guy that sold it to me put a new battery a new alternater and a new starter 3 monthes ago and since he had it repaired the battery lights on it always starts i have no problems with it besides the battery light and abs light any info on how to fix this would be great thanks,,
CouchAddiction is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-07-2011, 11:23   #2 (permalink)
2002 F150 XLT
 
Bert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 9,702
Re: Battery light stays on but runs fine??

Check the voltage at the battery when it's running to see if it really is charging.
__________________
Bert
Bert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 11:31   #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3
Re: Battery light stays on but runs fine??

Thanks for the quick reply bert...the guy i bought it from had a garage replace the parts and they tested all of it and all was good they couldnt figure out why the light wouldnt go off,,i had a friend with a 98 dodge neon he had the alternater changed at a garage and the same thing happened to him and it was a plug that plugged into the battery tray that was unplugged..
i thought maybe the van was something simular but i checked it and didnt find nothing so im a little confused :D
CouchAddiction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 12:55   #4 (permalink)
Always the student
 
thefonz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,707
Re: Battery light stays on but runs fine??

Two cents here, from an old school shade tree, that being said, new doesn't always mean it is good. Best advice (at least for a start) has already been given. check battery voltage with the engine running. I don't remember the exact voltage, but 13.5 - 14 volts is necessary to keep it properly charged. If not charging properly, a new battery may keep you going for a while, but sooner or later will eventually crap out on you. If the voltage is good going to the battery, you should be ok. Good clean and tight connections are also very important, positive and negative are equally important.
thefonz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 13:49   #5 (permalink)
Moderators
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Scotland
Posts: 10,043
Re: Battery light stays on but runs fine??

Again , dont know if this helps you . Also read a few articles saying broken wiring at door sheaths can cause this , but really no idea if this is a possible cause . Best I can do to help .



I have a 96 Windstar & had some charging problems as well. I narrowed mine down to a series of faulty NEW alternator/voltage regulators (Good thing they are on warranty).

Don't assume a replacement part is in serviceable condition. One winter I went through 6 rebuilt starters.


Answer
I've owned a lot of older cars and run into similar problems on vehicles.
Try this: First ensure your battery terminals are clean and free of corrosion. Make sure you use a battery tool to clean them up to ensure a good connection. reconnect and tighten.
NOTE: Some electrical systems need to have the system computer reset after changing an alternator. If you changed the battery first, then changed the alternator, this may not have happened. Sometimes it's as easy as fully disconnecting both terminals and reconnecting the battery.
Check the voltage from the positive terminal of the battery to the negative terminal on the battery(record this).
Then check voltage from the positive terminal of the battery to where the negative terminal connects to the block. if this reading is lower your negative battery cable may be the problem. I've had them crystallize before from age so badly that they lost flexibility and began breaking internally. Replace it.
Then check voltage from the smaller positive cable post on the alternator and the negative terminal on the battery. If this is lower the smaller cable may be the problem. Replace it.
Then check voltage from where your positive cable hooks up to the solenoid and to the negative terminal on the battery. if this is lower your positive battery cable may be the problem. Replace it.
Charge the battery fully and take the vehicle to a local auto parts store and see if they can run a charging system test (usually a free service). They should be able to tell you what kind of shape your battery is in and the alternator output. A good alternator will put out 14+ volts, if it's putting out 12-14 volts it's wearing out and needs replaced.
If your alternator is putting out 10-10.5 volts or less means one of the diode pairs are bad, 5-5.25 volts or less 2 diode pairs are bad. Either way the alternator is not charging the battery and it's the fault of the voltage regulator.
Ask the person doing the test if he can tell you what the field voltage is on the alternator. If they can and it is around 12 volts or more you can probably bypass the next test.

Start the vehicle and hold a steel tool near the back of the alternator (not on the pulley side). It should be drawn magnetically to the center of the alternator. If it doesn't your alternator is not generating the magnetic field needed, to generate electricity. This could be due to a bad alternator or wiring.

WARNING: The next test is the "old fashioned" way we shade-tree mechanics used to do this. It can be done with the engine running in most cases, but you must be extremely careful that you don't get clothing or long hair anywhere near the pulleys. You do this at your own risk. If you are uncomfortable with taking such a risk, have your mechanic look into it. Disconnect the two wire box-like electrical connector from the alternator's voltage regulator and see if there is any voltage (should be around 12 or more volts DC) from the wires going to the alternator. You can try testing this with the engine shut down and the key on, but it may not work on all vehicles. -

With connector disconnected, if the voltage is less than 12volts or non-existent, it's a wiring problem. - With connector disconnected, if it is 12 volts or above it's probably the alternator (Bad windings.)
Set the multimeter to Ohms. Touch probes together and calibrate the needle to zero on right side of meter readout. (If the needle does not move to the right, you may need to replace the meter's battery or fuse). With the Alternator connector disconnected check the resistance of the alternator at the connector blades. If the needle goes to infinity, there is an open circuit in the windings. Replace the alternator.
Other things that can cause charging system problems:

Excessive starter draw - Remove starter and take to parts store for testing
Bad solenoid

Failed engine compartment fuses or resisters - Look for and check big rectangular ceramic ones as well on antique/classic vehicles

Failed fusible links

Failing ignition switch - Usually under the dash, Not at the key
Wiring to the key assembly inside the steering column - or on the dash older vehicles

Bad computer modules

Electrical wiring - This one takes the longest to isolate
Particularly hot wires arcing to ground

Some other Windstar threads suggest checking wiring bundles under the rubber boots at door hinges.

Other unassociated electrical components shorting to ground and placing a drain on the system - could be anything from a cigarette lighter, to lighting, to electric radiator fans failing to shut off, ignition coil, radio, sensor probes shorting to ground, etc. etc.
R.S.LOGAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars > Ford Trucks | Utes | Vans |SUVs | Crossovers > Ford Vans and Mini Vans | Ford Aerostar | Ford Freestar | Ford Galaxy | Ford Windstar



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:31.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.