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Old 03-30-2005, 17:02   #1 (permalink)
gerald smith@impco.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
picknose

>>> Dean
>>
>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.

>

to which picknose replies
>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the exhaust
>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out the
>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>



lmfao
um no
in higher ELEVATION you get less
i see you have never taken chemistry
with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
up a vehicle

that would also explain why u dont understand how a cat can overheat
an engine u ask where the O2 came from u had better understand a
reduction reaction
i would take a chemistry course if i were you
chemestry is mandantory under the canadian apprentice program
if you need tutoring
if i can help you in any way just ping me

hurc ast


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Old 03-30-2005, 18:01   #2 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose


<gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>> Dean
>>>
>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.

>>

> to which picknose replies
>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>exhaust
>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out the
>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>

>
>
> lmfao
> um no
> in higher ELEVATION you get less
> i see you have never taken chemistry
> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
> up a vehicle
>


Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation of
5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't need
your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust, less
moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher humidity
less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you get
a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
stands.




> that would also explain why u dont understand how a cat can overheat
> an engine u ask where the O2 came from u had better understand a
> reduction reaction
> i would take a chemistry course if i were you
> chemestry is mandantory under the canadian apprentice program
> if you need tutoring
> if i can help you in any way just ping me
>
> hurc ast
>
>



  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 20:01   #3 (permalink)
gerald smith@impco.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>> Dean
>>>>
>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>

>> to which picknose replies
>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>exhaust
>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out the
>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>

>>
>>
>> lmfao
>> um no
>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>> up a vehicle
>>

>
>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation of
>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't need
>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust, less
>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher humidity
>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you get
>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>stands.
>
>
>


lmfao
so if i live in a humid part i breath out glasses of water

lmfao


hey tard its the mixture that is responsable for the water

heres a bone for ya

lmfao

here i will show you the math

Hydrocarbon fuel combustion under ideal conditions would produce
carbon dioxide and water as the only products

CnHm+po2+3.76p N2....nco2 +(m/2)h2o+3.76N2+deltaH deg c





u just failed your red seal test
i suggest u brush up on your chemistry

hurc ast
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 20:01   #4 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose


<gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
news:fkkm41hfpod19cegeijphqnef42vj9pidk@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>
>>
>><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>>> Dean
>>>>>
>>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>>
>>> to which picknose replies
>>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>>exhaust
>>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out
>>>>the
>>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> lmfao
>>> um no
>>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>>> up a vehicle
>>>

>>
>>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation
>>of
>>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't
>>need
>>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust,
>>less
>>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher
>>humidity
>>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you
>>get
>>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>>stands.
>>
>>
>>

>
> lmfao
> so if i live in a humid part i breath out glasses of water
>
> lmfao
>
>
> hey tard its the mixture that is responsable for the water
>
> heres a bone for ya
>
> lmfao
>
> here i will show you the math
>
> Hydrocarbon fuel combustion under ideal conditions would produce
> carbon dioxide and water as the only products
>
> CnHm+po2+3.76p N2....nco2 +(m/2)h2o+3.76N2+deltaH deg c
>
>
>
>
>
> u just failed your red seal test
> i suggest u brush up on your chemistry
>
> hurc ast



>>> lmfao
>>> um no
>>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>>> up a vehicle




Look moron, you got that idea from C.E. White's post to me.

Up to that point in time of your cave man grunt you were claiming that ELEVATION
was the total part of the equation. You did not even begin to mention any parts
of the combustion process and it's chemical out put. Unlike you I can admit when
I may not know something or fully understand something. The fact is the water in
exhaust comes from both the air used for the combustion process and the process
it self. How much from the process is arguable, but why? So some poor racist of
middle eastern descent that some how was able too move to Canada can get his/her
jollies? I doubt you have such profound knowledge you claim. Am I going to take
the time to check your math, no I don't give a shit if it's correct or made up.


  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 20:01   #5 (permalink)
gerald smith@impco.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>> Dean
>>>>
>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>

>> to which picknose replies
>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>exhaust
>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out the
>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>

>>
>>
>> lmfao
>> um no
>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>> up a vehicle
>>

>
>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation of
>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't need
>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust, less
>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher humidity
>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you get
>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>stands.
>
>
>


lmfao
so if i live in a humid part i breath out glasses of water

lmfao


hey tard its the mixture that is responsable for the water

heres a bone for ya

lmfao

here i will show you the math

Hydrocarbon fuel combustion under ideal conditions would produce
carbon dioxide and water as the only products

CnHm+po2+3.76p N2....nco2 +(m/2)h2o+3.76N2+deltaH deg c





u just failed your red seal test
i suggest u brush up on your chemistry

hurc ast
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 21:01   #6 (permalink)
gerald smith@impco.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 21:32:44 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>news:fkkm41hfpod19cegeijphqnef42vj9pidk@4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>>>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>>>> Dean
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>>>
>>>> to which picknose replies
>>>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>>>exhaust
>>>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out
>>>>>the
>>>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> lmfao
>>>> um no
>>>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>>>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>>>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>>>> up a vehicle
>>>>
>>>
>>>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>>>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>>>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation
>>>of
>>>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>>>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>>>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>>>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>>>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>>>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't
>>>need
>>>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust,
>>>less
>>>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher
>>>humidity
>>>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you
>>>get
>>>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>>>stands.
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>> lmfao
>> so if i live in a humid part i breath out glasses of water
>>
>> lmfao
>>
>>
>> hey tard its the mixture that is responsable for the water
>>
>> heres a bone for ya
>>
>> lmfao
>>
>> here i will show you the math
>>
>> Hydrocarbon fuel combustion under ideal conditions would produce
>> carbon dioxide and water as the only products
>>
>> CnHm+po2+3.76p N2....nco2 +(m/2)h2o+3.76N2+deltaH deg c
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> u just failed your red seal test
>> i suggest u brush up on your chemistry
>>
>> hurc ast

>
>
>>>> lmfao
>>>> um no
>>>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>>>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>>>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>>>> up a vehicle

>
>
>
>Look moron, you got that idea from C.E. White's post to me.
>
>Up to that point in time of your cave man grunt you were claiming that ELEVATION
>was the total part of the equation. You did not even begin to mention any parts
>of the combustion process and it's chemical out put. Unlike you I can admit when
>I may not know something or fully understand something. The fact is the water in
>exhaust comes from both the air used for the combustion process and the process
>it self. How much from the process is arguable, but why? So some poor racist of
>middle eastern descent that some how was able too move to Canada can get his/her
>jollies? I doubt you have such profound knowledge you claim. Am I going to take
>the time to check your math, no I don't give a shit if it's correct or made up.
>

yup thats what i thought
and when it rains your car puts out gallons of water
lmfao
BWHAHAHAHAHA
you just failed your red seal test


hurc ast
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2005, 05:01   #7 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose


<gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
news:8som41te5ia5j3jedabtdpl1msh4tu75qh@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>
>>
>><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>>> Dean
>>>>>
>>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>>
>>> to which picknose replies
>>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>>exhaust
>>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out
>>>>the
>>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> lmfao
>>> um no
>>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>>> up a vehicle
>>>

>>
>>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation
>>of
>>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't
>>need
>>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust,
>>less
>>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher
>>humidity
>>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you
>>get
>>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>>stands.
>>
>>
>>

>
> lmfao
> so if i live in a humid part i breath out glasses of water
>

Breath out on glass, liquid condenses.

> lmfao
>
>
> hey tard its the mixture that is responsable for the water
>

Both, show it's not. Show where the water in the air does not come out the
exhaust.

> heres a bone for ya
>
> lmfao
>
> here i will show you the math
>
> Hydrocarbon fuel combustion under ideal conditions would produce
> carbon dioxide and water as the only products
>
> CnHm+po2+3.76p N2....nco2 +(m/2)h2o+3.76N2+deltaH deg c
>
>
>
>
>
> u just failed your red seal test
> i suggest u brush up on your chemistry
>
> hurc ast



  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2005, 12:01   #8 (permalink)
nospam.clare.nce@sny.der.on.ca
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>> Dean
>>>>
>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>

>> to which picknose replies
>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>exhaust
>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out the
>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>

>>
>>
>> lmfao
>> um no
>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>> up a vehicle
>>

>
>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation of
>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't need
>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust, less
>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher humidity
>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you get
>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>stands.
>
>
>


Possibly a SMALL difference, but hardly noticeable.
The FACT is, that for every gallon of gasoline burned, very close to a
gallon of moisture is produced (if burned cleanly and efficiently).
Now, if the exhaust is fully heated up, most of that moisture leaves
as an invisible vapour cloud, except on cold days when the re******t
dew-point combination makes the cloud visible. If the exhaust is not
sufficiently heated up, the moisture condenses in the pipes and drips
from the tailpipe.


>
>> that would also explain why u dont understand how a cat can overheat
>> an engine u ask where the O2 came from u had better understand a
>> reduction reaction
>> i would take a chemistry course if i were you
>> chemestry is mandantory under the canadian apprentice program
>> if you need tutoring
>> if i can help you in any way just ping me
>>
>> hurc ast
>>
>>

>


  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2005, 16:01   #9 (permalink)
tom
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose

u just failed your red seal test
> i suggest u brush up on your chemistry


RED SEAL... thats what you get when you bash a seal in the head with a 64
ounce louieville slugger, rite???
"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message
news:1J6dna9v77lzQdbfRVn-uw@comcast.com...
>
> <gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
> news:8som41te5ia5j3jedabtdpl1msh4tu75qh@4ax.com...
> > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
> >
> >>
> >><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
> >>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
> >>>>>> Dean
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
> >>>>
> >>> to which picknose replies
> >>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in

for
> >>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in

the
> >>>>exhaust
> >>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water

out
> >>>>the
> >>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> lmfao
> >>> um no
> >>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
> >>> i see you have never taken chemistry
> >>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
> >>> up a vehicle
> >>>
> >>
> >>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in

humidity
> >>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
> >>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an

elevation
> >>of
> >>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ

has an
> >>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet

with an
> >>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of

4076 feet
> >>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and

barometric
> >>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also

left out
> >>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I

don't
> >>need
> >>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the

exhaust,
> >>less
> >>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher
> >>humidity
> >>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area,

you
> >>get
> >>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get

less."
> >>stands.
> >>
> >>
> >>

> >
> > lmfao
> > so if i live in a humid part i breath out glasses of water
> >

> Breath out on glass, liquid condenses.
>
> > lmfao
> >
> >
> > hey tard its the mixture that is responsable for the water
> >

> Both, show it's not. Show where the water in the air does not come out the
> exhaust.
>
> > heres a bone for ya
> >
> > lmfao
> >
> > here i will show you the math
> >
> > Hydrocarbon fuel combustion under ideal conditions would produce
> > carbon dioxide and water as the only products
> >
> > CnHm+po2+3.76p N2....nco2 +(m/2)h2o+3.76N2+deltaH deg c
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > u just failed your red seal test
> > i suggest u brush up on your chemistry
> >
> > hurc ast

>
>



  Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2005, 17:01   #10 (permalink)
gerald smith@impco.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: picknose

On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 13:03:51 -0500, nospam.clare.nce@sny.der.on.ca
wrote:

>On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:08:41 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>
>>
>><gerald smith@impco.com> wrote in message
>>news:2lcm41t9bf4pndciltjdmlgfe41loeqib7@4ax.com...
>>>>>> Dean
>>>>>
>>>>> Internal combustion engines create water when running.
>>>>
>>> to which picknose replies
>>>>It doesn't create water, the water is already in the air it takes in for
>>>>combustion in the form of humidity. That humidity just condenses in the
>>>>exhaust
>>>>as it cools. Live in a very humid area, you get a fair amount of water out the
>>>>exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> lmfao
>>> um no
>>> in higher ELEVATION you get less
>>> i see you have never taken chemistry
>>> with that in mind i bet u cant even tune
>>> up a vehicle
>>>

>>
>>Sure the altitude or elevation of a given city can play a part in humidity
>>levels. There are more things that go into it. Example:
>>Denver, CO has an average relative humidity level of 15% and has an elevation of
>>5193 feet with an average barometric pressure of 30.14 in. Phoenix, AZ has an
>>average relative humidity level of 14% has an elevation of 1117 feet with an
>>average of 29.90 in. barometric pressure. Denver has an elevation of 4076 feet
>>higher than Phoenix yet has a higher average humidity level and barometric
>>pressure. Looks like you left pressure out of the equation. You also left out
>>temperature. Warmer air also tends to have more moisture. Basically I don't need
>>your help. As I said, more moisture in the air more water out the exhaust, less
>>moisture in the air les water out the exhaust. More moisture is higher humidity
>>less moisture is less humidity. My statement "Live in a very humid area, you get
>>a fair amount of water out the exhaust, live in a dry climate you get less."
>>stands.
>>
>>
>>

>
>Possibly a SMALL difference, but hardly noticeable.
>The FACT is, that for every gallon of gasoline burned, very close to a
>gallon of moisture is produced (if burned cleanly and efficiently).
>Now, if the exhaust is fully heated up, most of that moisture leaves
>as an invisible vapour cloud, except on cold days when the re******t
>dew-point combination makes the cloud visible. If the exhaust is not
>sufficiently heated up, the moisture condenses in the pipes and drips
>from the tailpipe.
>



if you look up the vapor trail from hi altitude jets is water
its so cold up there you see the cloud for hours

hurc ast
>
>>
>>> that would also explain why u dont understand how a cat can overheat
>>> an engine u ask where the O2 came from u had better understand a
>>> reduction reaction
>>> i would take a chemistry course if i were you
>>> chemestry is mandantory under the canadian apprentice program
>>> if you need tutoring
>>> if i can help you in any way just ping me
>>>
>>> hurc ast
>>>
>>>

>>


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