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Old 03-17-2005, 19:01   #1 (permalink)
barney rubble@sky.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
tom picknose failed second year apprentice

>>>
>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we will
>>> move forward.

>>
>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.

>
>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does what?
>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little pressure drop
>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at intake
>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion process
>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with a
>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you get
>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way over
>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>
>
>
>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad daylight
>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase in
>> cooling system temperature.
>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design and
>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along with
>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).

>
>
>Slight lack of power with a pipe that had collapsed makeing a pig plug? What do
>you take me for?
>


an idiot
u just proved it yourself
lmfao
The catalytic converter consists of small amounts of precious metal
deposited on a ceramic substrate. The failure mode is chemical ie
poisoning the precious metal with contminants like lead in gas or
mechanical, breaking up the ceramic substrate. Plugging is mechanical
failure (the ceramic substrate gets broken up into small fine pieces)

normal thermal cycling will eventually cause the ceramic to start to
crumble. Cats are designed to last 100k miles minimum but if the car
is driven only on short trips (every trip thermal cycles the cat) then
early failure could result.

Second, thermal shock will cause the ceramic to break up. Having the
car (and cat) up to operating temperature and driving thru deep water
for a long enough period will cause a thermal shock that could cause
problems.


Unlike the earlier two-way converters that could perform their job
relatively efficiently with a lean fuel mixture, the catalyst inside a
three-way converter that reduces NOX requires a rich fuel mixture. But
a rich fuel mixture increases CO levels in the exhaust. So to reduce
all three pollutants (HC, CO and NOX), a three-way converter requires
a fuel mixture that constantly changes or flip flops back and forth
from rich to lean. This, in turn, requires feedback carburetion or
electronic fuel injection, plus an oxygen sensor in the exhaust to
keep tabs on what’s happening with the fuel mixture.

Converters may also fail if they get too hot. This can be caused by
unburned fuel in the exhaust. Contributing factors include a rich fuel
mixture, ignition misfire (a fouled spark plug or bad plug wire) or a
burned exhaust valve that leaks compression. Fuel in the exhaust has
the same effect as dumping gasoline on a bed of glowing embers. Things
get real hot real fast. If the converter’s temperature climbs high
enough, it can melt the ceramic substrate that supports the catalyst
causing a partial or complete blockage inside. This increases
backpressure, preventing the engine from exhaling and robbing it of
power. Fuel consumption may shoot up and the engine may feel sluggish
at higher speeds. Or, if the converter is completely plugged, the
engine may stall after starting and not restart.



lmfao
now lets see
restrited exhaust
loaded engine
hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
i bet you get a rich condition
hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
coverter makes heat
plugs more
engine is more loaded
condition gets richer
more heat


hey pick nose

yor failed yeat too

no canada for you
lmfao

hurc ast





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Old 03-17-2005, 19:01   #2 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice


<barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
news:ni8k315c29skkic3i721jnmlvrpacttr6c@4ax.com...
>>>>
>>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we will
>>>> move forward.
>>>
>>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.

>>
>>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does
>>what?
>>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little pressure
>>drop
>>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at
>>intake
>>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion
>>process
>>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with a
>>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you get
>>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way over
>>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>>
>>
>>
>>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad
>>> daylight
>>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase in
>>> cooling system temperature.
>>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design and
>>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along with
>>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).

>>
>>
>>Slight lack of power with a pipe that had collapsed makeing a pig plug? What
>>do
>>you take me for?
>>

>
> an idiot
> u just proved it yourself
> lmfao
> The catalytic converter consists of small amounts of precious metal
> deposited on a ceramic substrate. The failure mode is chemical ie
> poisoning the precious metal with contminants like lead in gas or
> mechanical, breaking up the ceramic substrate. Plugging is mechanical
> failure (the ceramic substrate gets broken up into small fine pieces)
>


Show me a 1966 vehicle with a catalytic converter. I've never seen one. I doubt
your old enough to know what a 1966 vehicle no less a Ford FE engine looks like.
Look at the above text, where do you see a cat converter mentioned?

> normal thermal cycling will eventually cause the ceramic to start to
> crumble. Cats are designed to last 100k miles minimum but if the car
> is driven only on short trips (every trip thermal cycles the cat) then
> early failure could result.
>
> Second, thermal shock will cause the ceramic to break up. Having the
> car (and cat) up to operating temperature and driving thru deep water
> for a long enough period will cause a thermal shock that could cause
> problems.
>
>
> Unlike the earlier two-way converters that could perform their job
> relatively efficiently with a lean fuel mixture, the catalyst inside a
> three-way converter that reduces NOX requires a rich fuel mixture. But
> a rich fuel mixture increases CO levels in the exhaust. So to reduce
> all three pollutants (HC, CO and NOX), a three-way converter requires
> a fuel mixture that constantly changes or flip flops back and forth
> from rich to lean. This, in turn, requires feedback carburetion or
> electronic fuel injection, plus an oxygen sensor in the exhaust to
> keep tabs on what's happening with the fuel mixture.
>
> Converters may also fail if they get too hot. This can be caused by
> unburned fuel in the exhaust. Contributing factors include a rich fuel
> mixture, ignition misfire (a fouled spark plug or bad plug wire) or a
> burned exhaust valve that leaks compression. Fuel in the exhaust has
> the same effect as dumping gasoline on a bed of glowing embers. Things
> get real hot real fast. If the converter's temperature climbs high
> enough, it can melt the ceramic substrate that supports the catalyst
> causing a partial or complete blockage inside. This increases
> backpressure, preventing the engine from exhaling and robbing it of
> power. Fuel consumption may shoot up and the engine may feel sluggish
> at higher speeds. Or, if the converter is completely plugged, the
> engine may stall after starting and not restart.
>
>
>
> lmfao
> now lets see
> restrited exhaust
> loaded engine
> hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
> i bet you get a rich condition
> hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
> coverter makes heat
> plugs more
> engine is more loaded
> condition gets richer
> more heat
>
>
> hey pick nose
>
> yor failed yeat too
>
> no canada for you
> lmfao
>
> hurc ast
>
>
>
>
>



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Old 03-17-2005, 19:01   #3 (permalink)
barney rubble@sky.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 20:28:11 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
><barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>news:ni8k315c29skkic3i721jnmlvrpacttr6c@4ax.com...
>>>>>
>>>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we will
>>>>> move forward.
>>>>
>>>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.
>>>
>>>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does
>>>what?
>>>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>>>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little pressure
>>>drop
>>>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>>>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at
>>>intake
>>>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion
>>>process
>>>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with a
>>>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you get
>>>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way over
>>>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad
>>>> daylight
>>>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase in
>>>> cooling system temperature.
>>>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>>>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design and
>>>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>>>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along with
>>>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).


>
>Show me a 1966 vehicle with a catalytic converter. I've never seen one. I doubt
>your old enough to know what a 1966 vehicle no less a Ford FE engine looks like.
>Look at the above text, where do you see a cat converter mentioned?
>


lmfao

and SCOLL UP
u ilterate tard
you said your most vivid recollection
the other stiff was abou a tarus




TOM WINS

lmfao
hurc ast
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Old 03-17-2005, 19:01   #4 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice


<barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
news:ksbk31togdclq3v2je6jfbs064nir6u6us@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 20:28:11 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>
>>
>><barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>>news:ni8k315c29skkic3i721jnmlvrpacttr6c@4ax.com...
>>>>>>
>>>>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we will
>>>>>> move forward.
>>>>>
>>>>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.
>>>>
>>>>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does
>>>>what?
>>>>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>>>>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little pressure
>>>>drop
>>>>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>>>>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at
>>>>intake
>>>>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion
>>>>process
>>>>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with a
>>>>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you get
>>>>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way over
>>>>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad
>>>>> daylight
>>>>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase in
>>>>> cooling system temperature.
>>>>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>>>>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design
>>>>> and
>>>>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>>>>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along with
>>>>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).

>
>>
>>Show me a 1966 vehicle with a catalytic converter. I've never seen one. I
>>doubt
>>your old enough to know what a 1966 vehicle no less a Ford FE engine looks
>>like.
>>Look at the above text, where do you see a cat converter mentioned?
>>

>
> lmfao
>
> and SCOLL UP
> u ilterate tard
> you said your most vivid recollection
> the other stiff was abou a tarus
>
>
>
>
> TOM WINS
>
> lmfao
> hurc ast

Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case I
ever saw). 1966 Taurus?


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Old 03-17-2005, 21:01   #5 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice


"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message
news:SP-dnULz3Oz93affRVn-og@comcast.com...
>
> <barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
> news:ksbk31togdclq3v2je6jfbs064nir6u6us@4ax.com...
>> On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 20:28:11 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>><barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>>>news:ni8k315c29skkic3i721jnmlvrpacttr6c@4ax.com...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we
>>>>>>> will
>>>>>>> move forward.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.
>>>>>
>>>>>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does
>>>>>what?
>>>>>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>>>>>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little pressure
>>>>>drop
>>>>>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>>>>>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at
>>>>>intake
>>>>>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion
>>>>>process
>>>>>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with a
>>>>>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you
>>>>>get
>>>>>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way over
>>>>>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad
>>>>>> daylight
>>>>>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase
>>>>>> in
>>>>>> cooling system temperature.
>>>>>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>>>>>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design
>>>>>> and
>>>>>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>>>>>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along with
>>>>>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).

>>
>>>
>>>Show me a 1966 vehicle with a catalytic converter. I've never seen one. I
>>>doubt
>>>your old enough to know what a 1966 vehicle no less a Ford FE engine looks
>>>like.
>>>Look at the above text, where do you see a cat converter mentioned?
>>>

>>
>> lmfao
>>
>> and SCOLL UP
>> u ilterate tard
>> you said your most vivid recollection
>> the other stiff was abou a tarus
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> TOM WINS
>>
>> lmfao
>> hurc ast

> Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
> recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case I
> ever saw). 1966 Taurus?
>

BTW, I did not have the "most vivid recollection", that was Tom Adkins. Now why
is a restricted exhaust going to cause an engine over heat? Explain how a oxygen
starved fire can make ample heat to damage an engine? I want to know the answer.
Explain how the engine cooling system does not come into play. Explain how you
can get enough oxygen into a cylinder that is already full of an inert gas to
excite combustion. What part of science explains that?


  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2005, 21:01   #6 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice


"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message
news:ZrydnXNlvIae36ffRVn-sg@comcast.com...
>
> "pick one" <try again!> wrote in message
> news:SP-dnULz3Oz93affRVn-og@comcast.com...
>>
>> <barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>> news:ksbk31togdclq3v2je6jfbs064nir6u6us@4ax.com...
>>> On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 20:28:11 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>><barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:ni8k315c29skkic3i721jnmlvrpacttr6c@4ax.com...
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we
>>>>>>>> will
>>>>>>>> move forward.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does
>>>>>>what?
>>>>>>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>>>>>>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little
>>>>>>pressure
>>>>>>drop
>>>>>>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>>>>>>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at
>>>>>>intake
>>>>>>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion
>>>>>>process
>>>>>>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with
>>>>>>a
>>>>>>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you
>>>>>>get
>>>>>>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way
>>>>>>over
>>>>>>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad
>>>>>>> daylight
>>>>>>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase
>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>> cooling system temperature.
>>>>>>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>>>>>>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design
>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>>>>>>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along
>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).
>>>
>>>>
>>>>Show me a 1966 vehicle with a catalytic converter. I've never seen one. I
>>>>doubt
>>>>your old enough to know what a 1966 vehicle no less a Ford FE engine looks
>>>>like.
>>>>Look at the above text, where do you see a cat converter mentioned?
>>>>
>>>
>>> lmfao
>>>
>>> and SCOLL UP
>>> u ilterate tard
>>> you said your most vivid recollection
>>> the other stiff was abou a tarus
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> TOM WINS
>>>
>>> lmfao
>>> hurc ast

>> Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
>> recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case
>> I ever saw). 1966 Taurus?
>>

> BTW, I did not have the "most vivid recollection", that was Tom Adkins. Now
> why is a restricted exhaust going to cause an engine over heat? Explain how a
> oxygen starved fire can make ample heat to damage an engine? I want to know
> the answer. Explain how the engine cooling system does not come into play.
> Explain how you can get enough oxygen into a cylinder that is already full of
> an inert gas to excite combustion. What part of science explains that?
>

OH, I KNOW THE CAR WAS EQUIPPED WITH A BLOWER!!!!!! Not!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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Old 03-17-2005, 21:01   #7 (permalink)
barney rubble@sky.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice


>Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
>recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case I
>ever saw). 1966 Taurus?


here ya go

play stupid all you want


busted
BWHAHAHAHAHA

>

On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 20:10:17 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
>"Tom Adkins" <newton5@remove.comcast.net> wrote in message
>news:Kr2dnfRIYqkDVqXfRVn-pw@comcast.com...
>>
>> Hey Pick one,
>> Putting our recent discussions aside....
>> First off, I don't think the OP has a plugged exhaust system. His description
>> was a bit sketchy. I've seen symptoms similar to this on high mileage Tauri
>> and it was usually fuel pressure related.

>
>That is the typical cause I'll agree but, a restricted exhaust will look and act
>just like low fuel pressure. You should know why.
>
>> Although it makes no real scientific sense and shouldn't happen,

>
>
>You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we will move
>forward.
>
>
>> I have seen a restricted exhaust cause much higher than normal cooling systen
>> temps, in severe cases to the point of overheating (usually the exhaust
>> manifolds were glowing orange at this point).

>
>I have seen glowing exhaust at night, I can tell you it was not because of a
>restricted exhaust, would you like to take a guess as to what the cause was?
>
>
>>I don't know why or how. Once the restriction was removed the temps returned to
>>normal.

>
>
>
>> There is the possibility of a less than optimal cooling system before the
>> restriction occured, or other underlying problems. After the restriction was
>> relieved, operation seemingly returned to within mormal parameters. I was
>> taught the same theory as you and don't dispute what you are saying BUT, I
>> have seen it happen on more than one occasion.

>
>I have never seen it happen ,and I can tell you I have at least a few years on
>you.
>
>> Regards, Tom Adkins

>


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Old 03-17-2005, 21:01   #8 (permalink)
barney rubble@sky.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice

t
>> Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
>> recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case I
>> ever saw). 1966 Taurus?
>>

>BTW, I did not have the "most vivid recollection", that was Tom Adkins. Now why
>is a restricted exhaust going to cause an engine over heat? Explain how a oxygen
>starved fire can make ample heat to damage an engine? I want to know the answer.
>Explain how the engine cooling system does not come into play. Explain how you
>can get enough oxygen into a cylinder that is already full of an inert gas to
>excite combustion. What part of science explains that?
>

lmfao
u better find out how a cat works
but then this is second year stuff
and u have no certification

coverter is hot
fuel condition are rich

add air from the air pump


instant heat
lmfao
put another log on the fire
BWHAHAHAHA

hurc ast

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Old 03-17-2005, 21:01   #9 (permalink)
barney rubble@sky.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 21:52:35 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:

>
>"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message
>news:ZrydnXNlvIae36ffRVn-sg@comcast.com...
>>
>> "pick one" <try again!> wrote in message
>> news:SP-dnULz3Oz93affRVn-og@comcast.com...
>>>
>>> <barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>>> news:ksbk31togdclq3v2je6jfbs064nir6u6us@4ax.com...
>>>> On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 20:28:11 -0500, "pick one" <try again!> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>><barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
>>>>>news:ni8k315c29skkic3i721jnmlvrpacttr6c@4ax.com...
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we
>>>>>>>>> will
>>>>>>>>> move forward.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Yes, I know how EGR controls NOX. I'm not arguing this with you.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Good then you know that introducing more inert gas to the intake air does
>>>>>>>what?
>>>>>>>Lowers combustion temp's. Now you have a plugged exhaust. Exhaust does not
>>>>>>>leave. Because of that there is not a pressure drop or very little
>>>>>>>pressure
>>>>>>>drop
>>>>>>>in the cylinder because it's still full or partially full. Because of that
>>>>>>>little to no pressure drop little to no fresh air enters the cylinder at
>>>>>>>intake
>>>>>>>stroke. The cylinder is full of mostly inert gas. How well is combustion
>>>>>>>process
>>>>>>>going to be? Not very well. Just like when you dilute the intake air with
>>>>>>>a
>>>>>>>little exhaust you drop the combustion temp's, with a lot of exhaust you
>>>>>>>get
>>>>>>>even less combustion temp's. Low enough that the cooling system is way
>>>>>>>over
>>>>>>>capicity to do a real nice job of taking out any built up heat.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> What I have seen is exhaust manifolds glowing bright orange in broad
>>>>>>>> daylight
>>>>>>>> due to exhaust restriction, along with (to the driver) a sharp increase
>>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>>> cooling system temperature.
>>>>>>>> The most vivid recollection was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor
>>>>>>>> home.(the first case I ever saw). The H pipe was of a triple wall design
>>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>>> the inner "wall" collapsed, mostly plugging the exhaust flow. The only
>>>>>>>> noticible concern was overheating and a slight lack of power. (Along
>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>> excessive heat radiating from the doghouse).
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Show me a 1966 vehicle with a catalytic converter. I've never seen one. I
>>>>>doubt
>>>>>your old enough to know what a 1966 vehicle no less a Ford FE engine looks
>>>>>like.
>>>>>Look at the above text, where do you see a cat converter mentioned?
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> lmfao
>>>>
>>>> and SCOLL UP
>>>> u ilterate tard
>>>> you said your most vivid recollection
>>>> the other stiff was abou a tarus
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> TOM WINS
>>>>
>>>> lmfao
>>>> hurc ast
>>> Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
>>> recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case
>>> I ever saw). 1966 Taurus?
>>>

>> BTW, I did not have the "most vivid recollection", that was Tom Adkins. Now
>> why is a restricted exhaust going to cause an engine over heat? Explain how a
>> oxygen starved fire can make ample heat to damage an engine? I want to know
>> the answer. Explain how the engine cooling system does not come into play.
>> Explain how you can get enough oxygen into a cylinder that is already full of
>> an inert gas to excite combustion. What part of science explains that?
>>

>OH, I KNOW THE CAR WAS EQUIPPED WITH A BLOWER!!!!!! Not!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
>



lmfao

reread the taurus
lmfao
HAHAHAHA
hahahahaOn Wed, 16 Mar 2005 20:10:17 -0500, "pick one" <try again!>
wrote:

>
>"Tom Adkins" <newton5@remove.comcast.net> wrote in message
>news:Kr2dnfRIYqkDVqXfRVn-pw@comcast.com...
>>
>> Hey Pick one,
>> Putting our recent discussions aside....
>> First off, I don't think the OP has a plugged exhaust system. His description
>> was a bit sketchy. I've seen symptoms similar to this on high mileage Tauri
>> and it was usually fuel pressure related.

>
>That is the typical cause I'll agree but, a restricted exhaust will look and act
>just like low fuel pressure. You should know why.
>
>> Although it makes no real scientific sense and shouldn't happen,

>
>
>You should know why EGR controls NOX, do you not? Answer that and we will move
>forward.
>
>
>> I have seen a restricted exhaust cause much higher than normal cooling systen
>> temps, in severe cases to the point of overheating (usually the exhaust
>> manifolds were glowing orange at this point).

>
>I have seen glowing exhaust at night, I can tell you it was not because of a
>restricted exhaust, would you like to take a guess as to what the cause was?
>
>
>>I don't know why or how. Once the restriction was removed the temps returned to
>>normal.

>
>
>
>> There is the possibility of a less than optimal cooling system before the
>> restriction occured, or other underlying problems. After the restriction was
>> relieved, operation seemingly returned to within mormal parameters. I was
>> taught the same theory as you and don't dispute what you are saying BUT, I
>> have seen it happen on more than one occasion.

>
>I have never seen it happen ,and I can tell you I have at least a few years on
>you.
>
>> Regards, Tom Adkins

>



  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2005, 21:01   #10 (permalink)
pick one
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: tom picknose failed second year apprentice


<barney rubble@sky.com> wrote in message
news:usgk315304r81q3gvg0hvfvkbu59ilf2re@4ax.com...
> t
>>> Ok, I just scrolled up, where Did I miss the name Taurus? The most "vivid
>>> recollection" was on a 1966 FE (428 cid) powered motor home. (the first case
>>> I
>>> ever saw). 1966 Taurus?
>>>

>>BTW, I did not have the "most vivid recollection", that was Tom Adkins. Now
>>why
>>is a restricted exhaust going to cause an engine over heat? Explain how a
>>oxygen
>>starved fire can make ample heat to damage an engine? I want to know the
>>answer.
>>Explain how the engine cooling system does not come into play. Explain how you
>>can get enough oxygen into a cylinder that is already full of an inert gas to
>>excite combustion. What part of science explains that?
>>

> lmfao
> u better find out how a cat works
> but then this is second year stuff
> and u have no certification
>
> coverter is hot
> fuel condition are rich
>
> add air from the air pump
>
>
> instant heat
> lmfao
> put another log on the fire
> BWHAHAHAHA
>
> hurc ast
>

Looks lie what I said was the cause of the cat frailer, your point? How does
that over heat an engine?


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