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Old 01-07-2006, 17:01   #1 (permalink)
CobraJet
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Falcon' Around

KB, the master cylinder has two equal reservoirs. The fluid is very
clean.

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Old 01-08-2006, 19:01   #2 (permalink)
Kevin Bottorff
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Re: Falcon' Around

CobraJet <coiled@basking.hiss> wrote in news:070120061714069099%
coiled@basking.hiss:

> KB, the master cylinder has two equal reservoirs. The fluid is very
> clean.
>


Ok that means that at least you have a drum brake master cyl. now it
would help if you knew what the bore size was but understand you probly
don`t have that info. Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch one,
also you need to check the brake ballance aka porporting valve, usually
by going on a gravel road or long drive and go about 20 mph and brake
fairly heavy and see which lock up first, front or rear. A helper to
watch makes this easier. With this info you can then start to decipher
where to start making a educated decision on what to change. KB

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Old 01-08-2006, 19:01   #3 (permalink)
Kevin Bottorff
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Re: Falcon' Around

Kevin Bottorff <kevySPAM@netins.net> wrote in
news:Xns9745CE9576FD6kevynetinsnet@167.142.225.136:

> CobraJet <coiled@basking.hiss> wrote in news:070120061714069099%
> coiled@basking.hiss:
>
>> KB, the master cylinder has two equal reservoirs. The fluid is very
>> clean.
>>

>
> Ok that means that at least you have a drum brake master cyl. now it
> would help if you knew what the bore size was but understand you probly
> don`t have that info. Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
> inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch one,
> also you need to check the brake ballance aka porporting valve, usually
> by going on a gravel road or long drive and go about 20 mph and brake
> fairly heavy and see which lock up first, front or rear. A helper to
> watch makes this easier. With this info you can then start to decipher
> where to start making a educated decision on what to change. KB
>


also on the one wheel locking up first, drum brakes are very fussy on
brake adj. also check the rubber lines to see any sign of damage or mucho
age. the rubber lines are known to colapse internally and so to slow the
flow of brake fluid to one side. tough to diagnose but if everything else
is ok should be suspected. KB

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460 in the pkup, 460 on the stand for another pkup
and one in the shed for a fun project to yet be decided on
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Old 01-08-2006, 19:01   #4 (permalink)
Wound Up
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Re: Falcon' Around

Kevin Bottorff wrote:
> Kevin Bottorff <kevySPAM@netins.net> wrote in
> news:Xns9745CE9576FD6kevynetinsnet@167.142.225.136:
>
>
>>CobraJet <coiled@basking.hiss> wrote in news:070120061714069099%
>>coiled@basking.hiss:
>>
>>
>>> KB, the master cylinder has two equal reservoirs. The fluid is very
>>>clean.
>>>

>>
>>Ok that means that at least you have a drum brake master cyl. now it
>>would help if you knew what the bore size was but understand you probly
>>don`t have that info. Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
>>inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch one,
>>also you need to check the brake ballance aka porporting valve, usually
>>by going on a gravel road or long drive and go about 20 mph and brake
>>fairly heavy and see which lock up first, front or rear. A helper to
>>watch makes this easier. With this info you can then start to decipher
>>where to start making a educated decision on what to change. KB
>>

>
>
> also on the one wheel locking up first, drum brakes are very fussy on
> brake adj. also check the rubber lines to see any sign of damage or mucho
> age. the rubber lines are known to colapse internally and so to slow the
> flow of brake fluid to one side. tough to diagnose but if everything else
> is ok should be suspected. KB
>


It may be slow to the other side, or one may be already under pressure.
If you're cracking open the system anyway, inspect the pull the hose
off to the suspected sticky wheel, and see if it's under pressure. If
any fluid squirts out while it's at rest, you've got a sticking,
misadjusted or incorrect mechanism, or wheel cylinder. Maybe the
springs are too light or something else is just incorrect. This test is
better with discs but the principle obviously remains the same. With
drums I'm thinking you'd also have the tendency for fade if this were
the problem. I actually had both on my OT car, and this was the deal
(sticky caliper).

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Old 01-08-2006, 19:01   #5 (permalink)
Wound Up
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Re: Falcon' Around

Maybe the
> springs are too light


heavy



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Old 01-09-2006, 10:01   #6 (permalink)
Big Al
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Re: Falcon' Around


"Kevin Bottorff" <kevySPAM@netins.net> wrote in message
news:Xns9745D027B9775kevynetinsnet@167.142.225.136...

> Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
> > inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch one,


1 inch would generate more brake pressure per pound of force on the pedal
than a 1 1/16 inch.

Al # 35



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Old 01-09-2006, 16:01   #7 (permalink)
CobraJet
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Re: Falcon' Around

In article <ynxwf.32$FJ.1280@news.uswest.net>, Big Al <sal1@qwest.net>
wrote:

> "Kevin Bottorff" <kevySPAM@netins.net> wrote in message
> news:Xns9745D027B9775kevynetinsnet@167.142.225.136...
>
> > Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
> > > inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch one,

>
> 1 inch would generate more brake pressure per pound of force on the pedal
> than a 1 1/16 inch.
>
> Al # 35
>
>
>


I'm going to move some lumber around so I fiddle with this car on
concrete. Maybe I'll have an excuse to use my new Mityvac Silverline
Plus.

CobraJet

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Old 01-09-2006, 17:01   #8 (permalink)
David M
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Re: Falcon' Around

On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 10:54:01 -0700, Big Al rearranged some electrons to
form:

>
> "Kevin Bottorff" <kevySPAM@netins.net> wrote in message
> news:Xns9745D027B9775kevynetinsnet@167.142.225.136...
>
>> Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
>> > inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch one,

>
> 1 inch would generate more brake pressure per pound of force on the pedal
> than a 1 1/16 inch.
>
> Al # 35


True, in pounds per square inch... but with a smaller bore (smaller
area, fewer square inches) you have to move the pedal farther
to displace the same amount of brake fluid (ie. obtain the
same force on the brake pads). More "P" with fewer "SI" still
gets the same amount of work done. (work = force applied over a
distance).

A system I worked on a dozen years back was designed to test things
in water at high pressure (10,000 PSI). The pump ran from 120 PSI
of air pressure...it had a large air diapraghm that pushed a
teeny-tiny piston. 120 PSI * ~200 in.sq = 24,000 pounds, pushing
a fluid piston with ~2 sq.in. area=12,000 PSI water pressure.

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Old 01-10-2006, 15:01   #9 (permalink)
Kevin Bottorff
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Re: Falcon' Around

David M <NOSPAM@nospam.com> wrote in
news:pan.2006.01.10.00.41.20.967468@sled351:

> On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 10:54:01 -0700, Big Al rearranged some electrons
> to form:
>
>>
>> "Kevin Bottorff" <kevySPAM@netins.net> wrote in message
>> news:Xns9745D027B9775kevynetinsnet@167.142.225.136...
>>
>>> Most of the modified stuff I have seen use the 1
>>> > inch bore cyl. to increase pressures you could go to a 1 1/16 inch
>>> > one,

>>
>> 1 inch would generate more brake pressure per pound of force on the
>> pedal than a 1 1/16 inch.
>>
>> Al # 35

>
> True, in pounds per square inch... but with a smaller bore (smaller
> area, fewer square inches) you have to move the pedal farther
> to displace the same amount of brake fluid (ie. obtain the
> same force on the brake pads). More "P" with fewer "SI" still
> gets the same amount of work done. (work = force applied over a
> distance).
>
> A system I worked on a dozen years back was designed to test things
> in water at high pressure (10,000 PSI). The pump ran from 120 PSI
> of air pressure...it had a large air diapraghm that pushed a
> teeny-tiny piston. 120 PSI * ~200 in.sq = 24,000 pounds, pushing
> a fluid piston with ~2 sq.in. area=12,000 PSI water pressure.
>


I just knew I would get it backwards. KB

--
ThunderSnake #9 Warn once, shoot twice
460 in the pkup, 460 on the stand for another pkup
and one in the shed for a fun project to yet be decided on
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