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Old 01-10-2006, 18:01   #1 (permalink)
David M
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
OT: They're coming....


http://www.naias.com/section.asp?sectionID=323


China's Geely Takes On the World
A dark horse tries to win in the nascent Chinese car industry
by Michael J. Dunne (2004-03-29)

Make no mistake about it: China one day plans to manufacture its
own cars for export worldwide, including to the United States and Europe.
But the road the Middle Kingdom takes to get there may be different from
the one mapped out by government officials in Beijing. Ever since
formation of China first automotive joint venture (Shanghai Automotive
Industry Corporation tied up with Volkswagen in 1984) China's strategy
has been for handpicked state enterprises to soak up car making knowledge
from their foreign partners - companies like Volkswagen, Honda, and
General Motors. Today, joint ventures account for 90 percent of car
production in China. Once the Chinese partners have enough know-how and
capital, they would have the option to build cars on their own. That has
been Beijing's view of the way things ought to unfold. But at least one
privately owned car company, Geely Automotive, has a different picture of
the future.

Geely founder and chairman, Li Shufu, is blunt: "Joint
ventures will fade away over time. Just like what happened with
motorcycles. In the future, it will be private Chinese companies that rule
the industry."

This is a bold declaration from the leader of a company that is just five
years old, has little research and development capabilities and was
recently taken to court by Toyota for alleged trademark infringement. Then
again, no one would have believed that Geely could achieve sales
of 80,000 sedans in 2003, capturing four percent of the China market.

--
David M (dmacchiarolo)
http://home.triad.rr.com/redsled
T/S 53
sled351 Linux 2.4.18-14 has been up 7 days 13:46

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Old 01-10-2006, 19:01   #2 (permalink)
Wound Up
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

David M wrote:
> http://www.naias.com/section.asp?sectionID=323
>
>
> China's Geely Takes On the World
> A dark horse tries to win in the nascent Chinese car industry
> by Michael J. Dunne (2004-03-29)
>
> Make no mistake about it: China one day plans to manufacture its
> own cars for export worldwide, including to the United States and Europe.
> But the road the Middle Kingdom takes to get there may be different from
> the one mapped out by government officials in Beijing. Ever since
> formation of China first automotive joint venture (Shanghai Automotive
> Industry Corporation tied up with Volkswagen in 1984) China's strategy
> has been for handpicked state enterprises to soak up car making knowledge
> from their foreign partners - companies like Volkswagen, Honda, and
> General Motors. Today, joint ventures account for 90 percent of car
> production in China. Once the Chinese partners have enough know-how and
> capital, they would have the option to build cars on their own. That has
> been Beijing's view of the way things ought to unfold. But at least one
> privately owned car company, Geely Automotive, has a different picture of
> the future.
>
> Geely founder and chairman, Li Shufu, is blunt: "Joint
> ventures will fade away over time. Just like what happened with
> motorcycles. In the future, it will be private Chinese companies that rule
> the industry."
>
> This is a bold declaration from the leader of a company that is just five
> years old, has little research and development capabilities and was
> recently taken to court by Toyota for alleged trademark infringement. Then
> again, no one would have believed that Geely could achieve sales
> of 80,000 sedans in 2003, capturing four percent of the China market.
>


I don't know about Geely cars, but Geely motor scooters have similar
value and durability to an orange plastic fixed-beam flashlights, and
they cost almost as much as quality brands. Every system fails, and
freaking good luck finding a repair manual - one that you could actually
understand, anyway.

--
Wound Up
ThunderSnake #65

AHPBBFM posting rules: http://tinyurl.com/ak694
AHPBBFM links repository: http://tinyurl.com/a9qsx

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Old 01-10-2006, 20:01   #3 (permalink)
CobraJet
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

In article <43C457DD.6020601@your.disposal>, Wound Up
<none@your.disposal> wrote:

> David M wrote:
> > http://www.naias.com/section.asp?sectionID=323
> >
> >
> > China's Geely Takes On the World
> > A dark horse tries to win in the nascent Chinese car industry
> > by Michael J. Dunne (2004-03-29)
> >
> > Make no mistake about it: China one day plans to manufacture its
> > own cars for export worldwide, including to the United States and Europe.
> > But the road the Middle Kingdom takes to get there may be different from
> > the one mapped out by government officials in Beijing. Ever since
> > formation of China first automotive joint venture (Shanghai Automotive
> > Industry Corporation tied up with Volkswagen in 1984) China's strategy
> > has been for handpicked state enterprises to soak up car making knowledge
> > from their foreign partners - companies like Volkswagen, Honda, and
> > General Motors. Today, joint ventures account for 90 percent of car
> > production in China. Once the Chinese partners have enough know-how and
> > capital, they would have the option to build cars on their own. That has
> > been Beijing's view of the way things ought to unfold. But at least one
> > privately owned car company, Geely Automotive, has a different picture of
> > the future.
> >
> > Geely founder and chairman, Li Shufu, is blunt: "Joint
> > ventures will fade away over time. Just like what happened with
> > motorcycles. In the future, it will be private Chinese companies that rule
> > the industry."
> >
> > This is a bold declaration from the leader of a company that is just five
> > years old, has little research and development capabilities and was
> > recently taken to court by Toyota for alleged trademark infringement. Then
> > again, no one would have believed that Geely could achieve sales
> > of 80,000 sedans in 2003, capturing four percent of the China market.
> >

>
> I don't know about Geely cars, but Geely motor scooters have similar
> value and durability to an orange plastic fixed-beam flashlights, and
> they cost almost as much as quality brands. Every system fails, and
> freaking good luck finding a repair manual - one that you could actually
> understand, anyway.


I think, seriously, that an Internet pre-emptive strike is in order.
People are now aware of the trouble the domestics are in. There needs
to be a campaign against Americans purchasing Chinese cars. Simple. IF
that happens and is successful in killing the market ahead of time, it
can spur further anti-import sentiment. We are at a critical time.
Action!

CobraJet

--
Spokesmodel for Arrogant Bastard Ale
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2006, 21:01   #4 (permalink)
Wound Up
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

CobraJet wrote:
> In article <43C457DD.6020601@your.disposal>, Wound Up
> <none@your.disposal> wrote:
>
>
>>David M wrote:
>>
>>>http://www.naias.com/section.asp?sectionID=323
>>>
>>>
>>>China's Geely Takes On the World
>>>A dark horse tries to win in the nascent Chinese car industry
>>>by Michael J. Dunne (2004-03-29)
>>>
>>>Make no mistake about it: China one day plans to manufacture its
>>>own cars for export worldwide, including to the United States and Europe.
>>>But the road the Middle Kingdom takes to get there may be different from
>>>the one mapped out by government officials in Beijing. Ever since
>>>formation of China first automotive joint venture (Shanghai Automotive
>>>Industry Corporation tied up with Volkswagen in 1984) China's strategy
>>>has been for handpicked state enterprises to soak up car making knowledge
>>>from their foreign partners - companies like Volkswagen, Honda, and
>>>General Motors. Today, joint ventures account for 90 percent of car
>>>production in China. Once the Chinese partners have enough know-how and
>>>capital, they would have the option to build cars on their own. That has
>>>been Beijing's view of the way things ought to unfold. But at least one
>>>privately owned car company, Geely Automotive, has a different picture of
>>>the future.
>>>
>>>Geely founder and chairman, Li Shufu, is blunt: "Joint
>>>ventures will fade away over time. Just like what happened with
>>>motorcycles. In the future, it will be private Chinese companies that rule
>>>the industry."
>>>
>>>This is a bold declaration from the leader of a company that is just five
>>>years old, has little research and development capabilities and was
>>>recently taken to court by Toyota for alleged trademark infringement. Then
>>>again, no one would have believed that Geely could achieve sales
>>>of 80,000 sedans in 2003, capturing four percent of the China market.
>>>

>>
>>I don't know about Geely cars, but Geely motor scooters have similar
>>value and durability to an orange plastic fixed-beam flashlights, and
>>they cost almost as much as quality brands. Every system fails, and
>>freaking good luck finding a repair manual - one that you could actually
>>understand, anyway.

>
>
> I think, seriously, that an Internet pre-emptive strike is in order.
> People are now aware of the trouble the domestics are in. There needs
> to be a campaign against Americans purchasing Chinese cars. Simple. IF
> that happens and is successful in killing the market ahead of time, it
> can spur further anti-import sentiment. We are at a critical time.
> Action!
>
> CobraJet
>


I cannot imagine them lasting very long in a market economy. You want
an idea of the probable quality? Think "Eastern Bloc Trabbie", that
2-stroke piece of crap that the masses waited years to buy.

--
Wound Up
ThunderSnake #65

See the official AHPBBFM posting rules, links repository,
member map and more at http://tinyurl.com/9yulk.



  Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2006, 22:01   #5 (permalink)
David M
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 03:29:34 +0000, Wound Up rearranged some electrons to
form:

> CobraJet wrote:
>> In article <43C457DD.6020601@your.disposal>, Wound Up
>> <none@your.disposal> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>David M wrote:
>>>
>>>>http://www.naias.com/section.asp?sectionID=323
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>China's Geely Takes On the World
>>>>A dark horse tries to win in the nascent Chinese car industry
>>>>by Michael J. Dunne (2004-03-29)
>>>>
>>>>Make no mistake about it: China one day plans to manufacture its
>>>>own cars for export worldwide, including to the United States and Europe.
>>>>But the road the Middle Kingdom takes to get there may be different from
>>>>the one mapped out by government officials in Beijing. Ever since
>>>>formation of China first automotive joint venture (Shanghai Automotive
>>>>Industry Corporation tied up with Volkswagen in 1984) China's strategy
>>>>has been for handpicked state enterprises to soak up car making knowledge
>>>>from their foreign partners - companies like Volkswagen, Honda, and
>>>>General Motors. Today, joint ventures account for 90 percent of car
>>>>production in China. Once the Chinese partners have enough know-how and
>>>>capital, they would have the option to build cars on their own. That has
>>>>been Beijing's view of the way things ought to unfold. But at least one
>>>>privately owned car company, Geely Automotive, has a different picture of
>>>>the future.
>>>>
>>>>Geely founder and chairman, Li Shufu, is blunt: "Joint
>>>>ventures will fade away over time. Just like what happened with
>>>>motorcycles. In the future, it will be private Chinese companies that rule
>>>>the industry."
>>>>
>>>>This is a bold declaration from the leader of a company that is just five
>>>>years old, has little research and development capabilities and was
>>>>recently taken to court by Toyota for alleged trademark infringement. Then
>>>>again, no one would have believed that Geely could achieve sales
>>>>of 80,000 sedans in 2003, capturing four percent of the China market.
>>>>
>>>
>>>I don't know about Geely cars, but Geely motor scooters have similar
>>>value and durability to an orange plastic fixed-beam flashlights, and
>>>they cost almost as much as quality brands. Every system fails, and
>>>freaking good luck finding a repair manual - one that you could actually
>>>understand, anyway.

>>
>>
>> I think, seriously, that an Internet pre-emptive strike is in order.
>> People are now aware of the trouble the domestics are in. There needs
>> to be a campaign against Americans purchasing Chinese cars. Simple. IF
>> that happens and is successful in killing the market ahead of time, it
>> can spur further anti-import sentiment. We are at a critical time.
>> Action!
>>
>> CobraJet
>>

>
> I cannot imagine them lasting very long in a market economy. You want
> an idea of the probable quality? Think "Eastern Bloc Trabbie", that
> 2-stroke piece of crap that the masses waited years to buy.


Maybe so, but they are one of the sponsors no less of the
North American Auto Show. Read the link, it describes their
methodical plan for ramping up their cars into the US,
by starting in Puerto Rico.

It's dangerous to underestimate the Chinese. You may be
too young to remember when Made In Japan signified cheap
and crappy.

Not to get back to my other thread, but like it or not,
Chinese 'crap' is what drives the engine of the world's
largest retailer, WalMart, not to mention their distant
competitors Kmart, Targert, Carrefour, etc. No matter how
crappy the merchandise, WalMart proves there is a market
for it.


--
David M (dmacchiarolo)
http://home.triad.rr.com/redsled
T/S 53
sled351 Linux 2.4.18-14 has been up 7 days 17:09

  Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2006, 23:01   #6 (permalink)
Wound Up
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

David M wrote:
> On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 03:29:34 +0000, Wound Up rearranged some electrons to
> form:
>
>
>>CobraJet wrote:
>>
>>>In article <43C457DD.6020601@your.disposal>, Wound Up
>>><none@your.disposal> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>David M wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>http://www.naias.com/section.asp?sectionID=323
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>China's Geely Takes On the World
>>>>>A dark horse tries to win in the nascent Chinese car industry
>>>>>by Michael J. Dunne (2004-03-29)
>>>>>
>>>>>Make no mistake about it: China one day plans to manufacture its
>>>>>own cars for export worldwide, including to the United States and Europe.
>>>>>But the road the Middle Kingdom takes to get there may be different from
>>>>>the one mapped out by government officials in Beijing. Ever since
>>>>>formation of China first automotive joint venture (Shanghai Automotive
>>>>>Industry Corporation tied up with Volkswagen in 1984) China's strategy
>>>>>has been for handpicked state enterprises to soak up car making knowledge
>>>>
>>>>>from their foreign partners - companies like Volkswagen, Honda, and
>>>>
>>>>>General Motors. Today, joint ventures account for 90 percent of car
>>>>>production in China. Once the Chinese partners have enough know-how and
>>>>>capital, they would have the option to build cars on their own. That has
>>>>>been Beijing's view of the way things ought to unfold. But at least one
>>>>>privately owned car company, Geely Automotive, has a different picture of
>>>>>the future.
>>>>>
>>>>>Geely founder and chairman, Li Shufu, is blunt: "Joint
>>>>>ventures will fade away over time. Just like what happened with
>>>>>motorcycles. In the future, it will be private Chinese companies that rule
>>>>>the industry."
>>>>>
>>>>>This is a bold declaration from the leader of a company that is just five
>>>>>years old, has little research and development capabilities and was
>>>>>recently taken to court by Toyota for alleged trademark infringement. Then
>>>>>again, no one would have believed that Geely could achieve sales
>>>>>of 80,000 sedans in 2003, capturing four percent of the China market.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>I don't know about Geely cars, but Geely motor scooters have similar
>>>>value and durability to an orange plastic fixed-beam flashlights, and
>>>>they cost almost as much as quality brands. Every system fails, and
>>>>freaking good luck finding a repair manual - one that you could actually
>>>>understand, anyway.
>>>
>>>
>>> I think, seriously, that an Internet pre-emptive strike is in order.
>>>People are now aware of the trouble the domestics are in. There needs
>>>to be a campaign against Americans purchasing Chinese cars. Simple. IF
>>>that happens and is successful in killing the market ahead of time, it
>>>can spur further anti-import sentiment. We are at a critical time.
>>>Action!
>>>
>>> CobraJet
>>>

>>
>>I cannot imagine them lasting very long in a market economy. You want
>>an idea of the probable quality? Think "Eastern Bloc Trabbie", that
>>2-stroke piece of crap that the masses waited years to buy.

>
>
> Maybe so, but they are one of the sponsors no less of the
> North American Auto Show. Read the link, it describes their
> methodical plan for ramping up their cars into the US,
> by starting in Puerto Rico.
>


Dear Lord, that is scary. I should have read the link. I will, now!

> It's dangerous to underestimate the Chinese. You may be
> too young to remember when Made In Japan signified cheap
> and crappy.
>


Maybe, but I do remember "made in Taiwan" very well.

> Not to get back to my other thread, but like it or not,
> Chinese 'crap' is what drives the engine of the world's
> largest retailer, WalMart, not to mention their distant
> competitors Kmart, Targert, Carrefour, etc. No matter how
> crappy the merchandise, WalMart proves there is a market
> for it.
>


I don't like it, but I believe you. I just saw "Geely" and remembered
nightmarish stories about their "ISO-9001" scooters.

--
Wound Up
ThunderSnake #65

See the official AHPBBFM posting rules, links repository,
member map and more at http://tinyurl.com/9yulk.



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Old 01-10-2006, 23:01   #7 (permalink)
HareBall
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

David M <NOSPAM@nospam.com> wrote in
news:pan.2006.01.11.04.11.27.158403@sled351:

>> I cannot imagine them lasting very long in a market economy. You
>> want an idea of the probable quality? Think "Eastern Bloc Trabbie",
>> that 2-stroke piece of crap that the masses waited years to buy.

>
> Maybe so, but they are one of the sponsors no less of the
> North American Auto Show. Read the link, it describes their
> methodical plan for ramping up their cars into the US,
> by starting in Puerto Rico.
>
> It's dangerous to underestimate the Chinese. You may be
> too young to remember when Made In Japan signified cheap
> and crappy.
>
> Not to get back to my other thread, but like it or not,
> Chinese 'crap' is what drives the engine of the world's
> largest retailer, WalMart, not to mention their distant
> competitors Kmart, Targert, Carrefour, etc. No matter how
> crappy the merchandise, WalMart proves there is a market
> for it.


All I know is the company I work for makes airbag inflators and we have
people over there right now getting a plant started up. Even as we are
starting up a Mexican plant. They have an Italian plant that is in the
process of being closed down and moved to Mexico. We figure we have about 5
years and our plant will be closed.

--
Larry S.
TS 52
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 00:01   #8 (permalink)
keller428@hotmail.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....


You bet your ass they're coming. I lived there for six months while
working for Kodak back in 2000 and witnessed this first hand.

These people have been given a tiny taste of the fruits of, if not a
westernized/democratic government, a somewhat westernized life style
and some simple luxuries. Major cultural differences aside, most folks
I've talked to there want a more westernized lifestyle and more
freedom.

I wasn't here to experience the early post WWII US as far as morale,
pride, and the willingness to bust your ass for the good of the country
and yourself....but I've talked with enough people who were here (and
watch plenty of the History Channel) to get an idea of what it was like
then. I very much equate general atmosphere (at least in China's
Special Economic Zones or S.E.Z. areas) to that of the post war boom
here in the US.

The typical Chinese worker will follow direction to the letter. TO THE
LETTER almost without question. When a process works well these folks
pump out serious amounts of inexpensive goods at ever increasing
quality levels. They quite literally will run through a wall for you if
need be. The economics of their pay/cost of living is alot different
than ours but they seem to be quite happy busting their butts for
modest wages. They save up and buy only the best items they can afford.
They technology jump every chance they get. There are few land-line
phones there.....however, I have pictures of an old farmer with a one
bottom plow being pulled by a whipped old ox. He stopped to answer his
new Nokia telephone. Same goes for consumer electronics and most other
significant purchases. They bust they're butt to save up for the best
they can get and **wait** until they can afford it. Most folks don't do
credit there. They don't whine much about their jobs or pay and most of
them do a very good job. Its something many parts of our society here
in the US have gotten away from and its going to bite us in the butt.

There are still some low quality goods coming out of China...but by
and large most items/industries across the board are getting better and
better while maintaining low costs. They've got a HUGE work force
that'll work at much lower wages (for the time being)....a work force
thats becoming better educated and more driven.

Many of the Chinese companies have adopted the Toyota systems of
management quality control (Kaizen and others) right from the get
go...an advantage over many US companies right from the start. The
Chinese have been learning from the mistakes the US, Japanese, and
Russian governments and large companies have been making ....waiting in
the wings, learning, building and improving along the way......quite
quietly in the shadows.

Be very much aware that the US will be surpassed by China in the near
future as an economic super power. We're already having trouble with
competing for oil, steel, fibers and lumber. The building blocks of our
nation are heading overseas....much of it to the highest
bidder.....many times China. Gaining significant control of major world
markets is only the begining. We're gonna have our hands full with
China in the future....no doubt about it.

-Mike.

  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 19:01   #9 (permalink)
CobraJet
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

In article <1136962324.605623.145150@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
<"keller428@hotmail.com"> wrote:

> You bet your ass they're coming. I lived there for six months while
> working for Kodak back in 2000 and witnessed this first hand.
>
> These people have been given a tiny taste of the fruits of, if not a
> westernized/democratic government, a somewhat westernized life style
> and some simple luxuries. Major cultural differences aside, most folks
> I've talked to there want a more westernized lifestyle and more
> freedom.
>
> I wasn't here to experience the early post WWII US as far as morale,
> pride, and the willingness to bust your ass for the good of the country
> and yourself....but I've talked with enough people who were here (and
> watch plenty of the History Channel) to get an idea of what it was like
> then. I very much equate general atmosphere (at least in China's
> Special Economic Zones or S.E.Z. areas) to that of the post war boom
> here in the US.
>
> The typical Chinese worker will follow direction to the letter. TO THE
> LETTER almost without question. When a process works well these folks
> pump out serious amounts of inexpensive goods at ever increasing
> quality levels. They quite literally will run through a wall for you if
> need be. The economics of their pay/cost of living is alot different
> than ours but they seem to be quite happy busting their butts for
> modest wages. They save up and buy only the best items they can afford.
> They technology jump every chance they get. There are few land-line
> phones there.....however, I have pictures of an old farmer with a one
> bottom plow being pulled by a whipped old ox. He stopped to answer his
> new Nokia telephone. Same goes for consumer electronics and most other
> significant purchases. They bust they're butt to save up for the best
> they can get and **wait** until they can afford it. Most folks don't do
> credit there. They don't whine much about their jobs or pay and most of
> them do a very good job. Its something many parts of our society here
> in the US have gotten away from and its going to bite us in the butt.
>
> There are still some low quality goods coming out of China...but by
> and large most items/industries across the board are getting better and
> better while maintaining low costs. They've got a HUGE work force
> that'll work at much lower wages (for the time being)....a work force
> thats becoming better educated and more driven.
>
> Many of the Chinese companies have adopted the Toyota systems of
> management quality control (Kaizen and others) right from the get
> go...an advantage over many US companies right from the start. The
> Chinese have been learning from the mistakes the US, Japanese, and
> Russian governments and large companies have been making ....waiting in
> the wings, learning, building and improving along the way......quite
> quietly in the shadows.
>
> Be very much aware that the US will be surpassed by China in the near
> future as an economic super power. We're already having trouble with
> competing for oil, steel, fibers and lumber. The building blocks of our
> nation are heading overseas....much of it to the highest
> bidder.....many times China. Gaining significant control of major world
> markets is only the begining. We're gonna have our hands full with
> China in the future....no doubt about it.
>
> -Mike.
>


So, perhaps, since too many Americans have become the lazy,
self-centered bastards bereft of ethics that most of the world sees us
as, then perhaps we deserve to have a wake-up call. Maybe our fate is
in the Matrix.

CobraJet

--
Spokesmodel for Arrogant Bastard Ale
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 19:01   #10 (permalink)
CobraJet
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: OT: They're coming....

In article <Xns9748729D3C37HareBallSPAMSUCKScom@216.196.97.136>,
HareBall <HareBall@SPAMSUCKScomcast.net> wrote:

> David M <NOSPAM@nospam.com> wrote in
> news:pan.2006.01.11.04.11.27.158403@sled351:
>
> >> I cannot imagine them lasting very long in a market economy. You
> >> want an idea of the probable quality? Think "Eastern Bloc Trabbie",
> >> that 2-stroke piece of crap that the masses waited years to buy.

> >
> > Maybe so, but they are one of the sponsors no less of the
> > North American Auto Show. Read the link, it describes their
> > methodical plan for ramping up their cars into the US,
> > by starting in Puerto Rico.
> >
> > It's dangerous to underestimate the Chinese. You may be
> > too young to remember when Made In Japan signified cheap
> > and crappy.
> >
> > Not to get back to my other thread, but like it or not,
> > Chinese 'crap' is what drives the engine of the world's
> > largest retailer, WalMart, not to mention their distant
> > competitors Kmart, Targert, Carrefour, etc. No matter how
> > crappy the merchandise, WalMart proves there is a market
> > for it.


Well, if the Chinese can sell me a new 14-second buzz bomb for 7
grand, and stock the spare parts at Walmart, then I'm in. As long as it
has 15-inch wheels. No Dubs. I got all jacked up over the new
Challenger, until I saw the Dubs wheels. What are those morons at Dodge
thinking? Ugh.

>
> All I know is the company I work for makes airbag inflators and we have
> people over there right now getting a plant started up. Even as we are
> starting up a Mexican plant. They have an Italian plant that is in the
> process of being closed down and moved to Mexico. We figure we have about 5
> years and our plant will be closed.


See, Mexico is the happenin' place. Did you know there is an
NHRA-sanctioned dragstrip across the border? Damn, I really have to
check the real estate market there.

CobraJet

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Spokesmodel for Arrogant Bastard Ale
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  Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars > Fordforums Community > USENET NewsGroups > alt.hi-po.big-block-ford-mercury



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