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Old 03-29-2005, 15:01   #1 (permalink)
stevie
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Posts: n/a
thermostat

While changing my water pump, I decided to go ahead and put in a new
thermostat.

It is held on with two bolts (sort of diagonal) and the bottom one is a bear
to get to. While reinserting the bottom bolt I noticed it was very
difficult to put back in. I thought it was going in crooked, but I don't
think this is the case.

So now that all is back together, the thermostat is leaking, and it appears
that the bottom bolt is not seated completely. The thermostat is right
below the distibutor which has a part I'm not familiar with attached to it.
It has the letters 'WAN' on it and has one vacuum hose attached to it. If I
removed this, I might be able to access to bottom thermostat bolt more
easily. It looks to be held on with 2 screws.

Does anyone have any suggestions on replacing the thermostat, especially how
to access the bottom bolt? Why would the bottom bolt be difficult to
reinsert? I did use new gasket and sealer.

Thanks for any help.

1982 F100
302 V8
AC, PS, PB
136000 miles



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Old 03-29-2005, 22:01   #2 (permalink)
Tyrone
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Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

Sounds like you may have cross-threaded that bolt, Dude.

"stevie" <sf@dum.org> wrote in message
news:lBk2e.20836$RZ.119@fe07.lga...
> While changing my water pump, I decided to go ahead and put in a new
> thermostat.
>
> It is held on with two bolts (sort of diagonal) and the bottom one is

a bear
> to get to. While reinserting the bottom bolt I noticed it was very
> difficult to put back in. I thought it was going in crooked, but I

don't
> think this is the case.
>
> So now that all is back together, the thermostat is leaking, and it

appears
> that the bottom bolt is not seated completely. The thermostat is

right
> below the distibutor which has a part I'm not familiar with attached

to it.
> It has the letters 'WAN' on it and has one vacuum hose attached to it.

If I
> removed this, I might be able to access to bottom thermostat bolt more
> easily. It looks to be held on with 2 screws.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions on replacing the thermostat,

especially how
> to access the bottom bolt? Why would the bottom bolt be difficult to
> reinsert? I did use new gasket and sealer.
>
> Thanks for any help.
>
> 1982 F100
> 302 V8
> AC, PS, PB
> 136000 miles
>
>
>



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Old 03-30-2005, 18:01   #3 (permalink)
Al Bundy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

Ok, it's confession time again. One time it was about -300 degrees on
the Kelvin scale and I had the same problem with the bottom bolt except
I just could not get it started with my fingers. If I can't start it
with my fingers I am not going to force it. After many tries and early
in the AM I decided to start the bolt without the T-stat housing in
place. Then I hacksawed the outside edge of the housing enough to slip
over the bolt and I was done and moving in just a few minutes and
nothing ever leaked. It was an emergency and the housing is pretty
cheap any way.
If it's not an emergengy I'd take everything off and work with that
hole until the bolt went in easy. You might even need to retap the
hole. It does sound like you cross threaded that hole if it went in
hard and especially if it started at an angle and then straightened
out. Even Stevie Wonder could see that.

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Old 03-30-2005, 19:01   #4 (permalink)
stevie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

thanks for the replies.

While trying to initially install the bolt, I must have started it 10 times.
The bolt went into the other hole just fine, and I could start it with my
fingers in either hole, but it soon became tight to turn in the bottom hole.
On close examination, it is not completely seated, which I suppose is why
the tstat leaks. But it does look straight. It may lack about 1/8" to 1/4"
to be completly seated.

I think I might be able to remove the bolt and install a couple more lock
washers to tighten. However, you are probably right-it may very well be
cross-threaded.


"Al Bundy" <MSfortune@mcpmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112233475.224465.162590@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
Ok, it's confession time again. One time it was about -300 degrees on
the Kelvin scale and I had the same problem with the bottom bolt except
I just could not get it started with my fingers. If I can't start it
with my fingers I am not going to force it. After many tries and early
in the AM I decided to start the bolt without the T-stat housing in
place. Then I hacksawed the outside edge of the housing enough to slip
over the bolt and I was done and moving in just a few minutes and
nothing ever leaked. It was an emergency and the housing is pretty
cheap any way.
If it's not an emergengy I'd take everything off and work with that
hole until the bolt went in easy. You might even need to retap the
hole. It does sound like you cross threaded that hole if it went in
hard and especially if it started at an angle and then straightened
out. Even Stevie Wonder could see that.


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Old 03-30-2005, 21:01   #5 (permalink)
The OTHER Kevin in San Diego
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 20:25:39 -0600, "stevie" <sf@dum.org> wrote:

>thanks for the replies.
>
>While trying to initially install the bolt, I must have started it 10 times.
>The bolt went into the other hole just fine, and I could start it with my
>fingers in either hole, but it soon became tight to turn in the bottom hole.
>On close examination, it is not completely seated, which I suppose is why
>the tstat leaks. But it does look straight. It may lack about 1/8" to 1/4"
>to be completly seated.
>
>I think I might be able to remove the bolt and install a couple more lock
>washers to tighten. However, you are probably right-it may very well be
>cross-threaded.


You could have a bunch of crap/water in the hole. Blow it out with
compressed air and try again.
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Old 03-31-2005, 10:02   #6 (permalink)
Stephen
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

Aiyiyi!

Don't do anything without at least chasing the threads out with a proper
sized tap. Everytime you screw that bolt in you are doing more damage
to the threads. If it is badly cross threaded, you will need to drill
the hole out and put in a heli-coil. Even this is not a big deal and it
is a permanent fix.

There is very holding strength in a cross threaded hole. You don't want
to be springing a leak some day far from home.

Stephen --> Sprung a few leaks in my time...



The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:
> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 20:25:39 -0600, "stevie" <sf@dum.org> wrote:
>
>
>>thanks for the replies.
>>
>>While trying to initially install the bolt, I must have started it 10 times.
>>The bolt went into the other hole just fine, and I could start it with my
>>fingers in either hole, but it soon became tight to turn in the bottom hole.
>>On close examination, it is not completely seated, which I suppose is why
>>the tstat leaks. But it does look straight. It may lack about 1/8" to 1/4"
>>to be completly seated.
>>
>>I think I might be able to remove the bolt and install a couple more lock
>>washers to tighten. However, you are probably right-it may very well be
>>cross-threaded.

>
>
> You could have a bunch of crap/water in the hole. Blow it out with
> compressed air and try again.


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Old 03-31-2005, 12:01   #7 (permalink)
The OTHER Kevin in San Diego
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:23:36 GMT, Stephen <steelystephen@coldmail.com>
wrote:

>Aiyiyi!
>
>Don't do anything without at least chasing the threads out with a proper
>sized tap. Everytime you screw that bolt in you are doing more damage
>to the threads. If it is badly cross threaded, you will need to drill
>the hole out and put in a heli-coil. Even this is not a big deal and it
>is a permanent fix.
>
>There is very holding strength in a cross threaded hole. You don't want
>to be springing a leak some day far from home.
>
>Stephen --> Sprung a few leaks in my time...


I'm assuming the difficulty in getting the bolt in was/is due to crap
in the hole.. If there's a bunch of junk in the hole, the bolt is
going to try to compress it and that material has nowhere to go.
Since this is the lower bolt on a thermostat housing, it's possible
some coolant wicked into the hole. Fluids don't compress and trying
to run a bolt into a hole in that instance will prevent it from
seating all the way and it will be more difficult to turn.

Blow the hole out and try again. If it's still difficult, then by all
means, chase the threads.
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Old 03-31-2005, 12:01   #8 (permalink)
stevie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

thanks again for the replies.

I'm going to go out and retry some things this afternoon (Thurs). You may
have a very good point about stuff in the hole. I examined the bolt
(earlier in the week) and it did not appear to have bad threads; plus, it
went easily into the top hole.

One of the big problems is getting to the bolt. I will probably have to
remove the AC bracket. Even then, it is difficult to reach.

Fortunately, this is my older truck, and this isn't an emergency.
"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
message news:anho41pq5bqc93rdmo42tm34k53f8gf2i6@4ax.com...
On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:23:36 GMT, Stephen <steelystephen@coldmail.com>
wrote:

>Aiyiyi!
>
>Don't do anything without at least chasing the threads out with a proper
>sized tap. Everytime you screw that bolt in you are doing more damage
>to the threads. If it is badly cross threaded, you will need to drill
>the hole out and put in a heli-coil. Even this is not a big deal and it
>is a permanent fix.
>
>There is very holding strength in a cross threaded hole. You don't want
>to be springing a leak some day far from home.
>
>Stephen --> Sprung a few leaks in my time...


I'm assuming the difficulty in getting the bolt in was/is due to crap
in the hole.. If there's a bunch of junk in the hole, the bolt is
going to try to compress it and that material has nowhere to go.
Since this is the lower bolt on a thermostat housing, it's possible
some coolant wicked into the hole. Fluids don't compress and trying
to run a bolt into a hole in that instance will prevent it from
seating all the way and it will be more difficult to turn.

Blow the hole out and try again. If it's still difficult, then by all
means, chase the threads.


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Old 04-01-2005, 13:01   #9 (permalink)
stevie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

I'm going to jump off a bridge.

I reinstalled thermostat. The bottom bolt seemed to go in OK-I do not
believe it is cross threaded, even though it is somewhat harder to turn. It
seems to tighten OK.

I think what has happened, both times, is that the tstat does not stay in
the indentation of the elbow but drops a little and creates an opening
between elbow and engine. This happens when I reinstall the elbow with new
thermostat. The water leaks now, even with the engine off. So I'm pretty
sure I haven't got a good seal. I am using sealant and new gasket.

Can anyone suggest how to hold the tstat in place while reinstalling? I
have Chilton manual . It says turn tstat clockwise to anchor in the elbow,
but I don't see any way to anchor that by giving it a twist. The Autozone
how-to site says the same thing (it's a reprint of Chilton).

In addition, I am placing gasket on the engine (using sealant) and placing
tstat in the elbow, which is how indicated in the Chilton. Is this correct?

One of the biggest problems is accessing the tstat. I have been removing
the AC bracket, radiator, and fan. This just takes some time.

The Autozone site shows pictures of someone removing the bottom bolt, with
another hand near the tstat. Whoever is in the picture must have a right
arm at least 4 foot long. Anyway, the picture is an '83 302 V8, which looks
about the same as mine.

Any suggestion would be appreciated.



"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
message news:anho41pq5bqc93rdmo42tm34k53f8gf2i6@4ax.com...
On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:23:36 GMT, Stephen <steelystephen@coldmail.com>
wrote:

>Aiyiyi!
>
>Don't do anything without at least chasing the threads out with a proper
>sized tap. Everytime you screw that bolt in you are doing more damage
>to the threads. If it is badly cross threaded, you will need to drill
>the hole out and put in a heli-coil. Even this is not a big deal and it
>is a permanent fix.
>
>There is very holding strength in a cross threaded hole. You don't want
>to be springing a leak some day far from home.
>
>Stephen --> Sprung a few leaks in my time...


I'm assuming the difficulty in getting the bolt in was/is due to crap
in the hole.. If there's a bunch of junk in the hole, the bolt is
going to try to compress it and that material has nowhere to go.
Since this is the lower bolt on a thermostat housing, it's possible
some coolant wicked into the hole. Fluids don't compress and trying
to run a bolt into a hole in that instance will prevent it from
seating all the way and it will be more difficult to turn.

Blow the hole out and try again. If it's still difficult, then by all
means, chase the threads.


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Old 04-01-2005, 15:01   #10 (permalink)
SC Tom
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: thermostat

I have used a couple of spots of sealer to hold the stat in place, but
normally what I did was use the sealer to hold the gasket to the elbow
instead of the block- that always worked well.
If the bottom bolt is still that hard to run in, I'd do like Kevin said and
chase those threads first. You have nothing to lose by doing it, and you may
save yourself some unnecessary work down the road.
Good luck!
SC Tom

"stevie" <sf@dum.org> wrote in message news:wDh3e.2518$ms7.1031@fe04.lga...
> I'm going to jump off a bridge.
>
> I reinstalled thermostat. The bottom bolt seemed to go in OK-I do not
> believe it is cross threaded, even though it is somewhat harder to turn.
> It
> seems to tighten OK.
>
> I think what has happened, both times, is that the tstat does not stay in
> the indentation of the elbow but drops a little and creates an opening
> between elbow and engine. This happens when I reinstall the elbow with
> new
> thermostat. The water leaks now, even with the engine off. So I'm pretty
> sure I haven't got a good seal. I am using sealant and new gasket.
>
> Can anyone suggest how to hold the tstat in place while reinstalling? I
> have Chilton manual . It says turn tstat clockwise to anchor in the
> elbow,
> but I don't see any way to anchor that by giving it a twist. The Autozone
> how-to site says the same thing (it's a reprint of Chilton).
>
> In addition, I am placing gasket on the engine (using sealant) and placing
> tstat in the elbow, which is how indicated in the Chilton. Is this
> correct?
>
> One of the biggest problems is accessing the tstat. I have been removing
> the AC bracket, radiator, and fan. This just takes some time.
>
> The Autozone site shows pictures of someone removing the bottom bolt, with
> another hand near the tstat. Whoever is in the picture must have a right
> arm at least 4 foot long. Anyway, the picture is an '83 302 V8, which
> looks
> about the same as mine.
>
> Any suggestion would be appreciated.
>
>
>
> "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
> message news:anho41pq5bqc93rdmo42tm34k53f8gf2i6@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:23:36 GMT, Stephen <steelystephen@coldmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Aiyiyi!
>>
>>Don't do anything without at least chasing the threads out with a proper
>>sized tap. Everytime you screw that bolt in you are doing more damage
>>to the threads. If it is badly cross threaded, you will need to drill
>>the hole out and put in a heli-coil. Even this is not a big deal and it
>>is a permanent fix.
>>
>>There is very holding strength in a cross threaded hole. You don't want
>>to be springing a leak some day far from home.
>>
>>Stephen --> Sprung a few leaks in my time...

>
> I'm assuming the difficulty in getting the bolt in was/is due to crap
> in the hole.. If there's a bunch of junk in the hole, the bolt is
> going to try to compress it and that material has nowhere to go.
> Since this is the lower bolt on a thermostat housing, it's possible
> some coolant wicked into the hole. Fluids don't compress and trying
> to run a bolt into a hole in that instance will prevent it from
> seating all the way and it will be more difficult to turn.
>
> Blow the hole out and try again. If it's still difficult, then by all
> means, chase the threads.
>
>



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