Volvo Develops World's First Pregnant Crash Test Dummy - Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars
Ford Forum Ford Forum

» Auto Insurance
» Featured Product
» Wheel & Tire Center

Go Back   Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars > Ford Cars and PAG Vehicles > PAG Vehicle Discussion > Volvo
Register Home Forum Active Topics Photo Gallery Auto Loans Garage Mark Forums Read Auto Escrow

FordForums.com is the premier Ford Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-25-2002, 03:28   #1 (permalink)
Mr. Embargo
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Embargoland
Posts: 3,745
Volvo Develops World's First Pregnant Crash Test Dummy

Irvine, CA - There are comprehensive safety systems in modern cars designed to help protect just about every occupant - except the unborn child. Researchers still know surprisingly little about what happens to a fetus in a car crash.
     
To expand engineers' and designers' understanding in this area, Volvo Car Corporation has developed the world's first official computer model of a pregnant crash dummy.
     
This 'virtual' crash dummy is a woman at a late stage of her pregnancy, since that is when the unborn baby is at greatest risk in an accident. The basic geometry was completed in January, 2002 and much time has been devoted since then to refining the model.
     
"Now it's finished and we've started running simulated front-end impact tests on it," says Camilla Palmertz, a biomechanical engineer at the Volvo Cars Safety Centre in Göteborg, Sweden. "One big advantage is that both mother and baby can be scaled up or down to the size we want to study."
     
The purpose of these initial tests is to study how the virtual mother-to-be and her unborn baby are affected by the seat belt and airbag in simulated collisions. The computer model makes it possible to study - in great detail - how the belt moves, the influence of belt and airbag on the uterus, placenta and fetus, and how the fetus moves in relation to the mother's body, among other things. The model can also be used to test new designs for seat belts and other safety systems.
     
"I'm certain that there's room for further development of the three-point belt, to make it more comfortable and to provide even better protection," says Palmertz.
     
Many pregnant women wonder whether the seat belt could harm their unborn baby if they are involved in a car accident. Researchers all agree, however, in recommending that they should always wear their seat belt.
     
"But it's important to wear it in the right way. It should be between the breasts and as low as possible over the hips. The lap section of the belt mustn't be allowed to ride up in front of the woman's tummy," says Palmertz. "That could harm the baby."
     
In a crash, the pregnant woman's thorax and pelvis are both restrained by the belt, but her abdomen is free to move in the direction determined by the particular forces arising from the impact. Because the fetus is floating free inside her, injuries tend to fall into two main types. The more common of the two occurs when the placenta becomes either partially or completely detached, which means that the baby cannot get enough oxygen. Another, less likely scenario is for the head of the baby to be injured if it hits one of the bones of the mother's pelvis.

"We think that the placenta may become detached because, while the uterus is relatively elastic and can therefore change shape, the placenta is not equally resilient under acceleration," Palmertz explains.
   
"But we don't know yet," she continues. "That's why this model is so important. We have to find out more to be able to provide enhanced protection of the fetus in the best possible way."
 
Even though there is still a great deal to learn, Palmertz is philosophical about the project. "Now we've covered the whole life-cycle," she says.
__________________
*Retired.
RPO83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-25-2002, 03:49   #2 (permalink)
400 kg ego
 
Troutman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 6,188
Good thinking. I think Holden invented the first "Kangeroo" crash test dummy.
__________________
Jack Travis, E-Series Acting President

1989 Ford Fairmont Ghia turbo/GL replica (underway)
1994 Eunos 800M
1990 Ford Laser S
Troutman is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Ford Forums - Mustang Forum, Ford Trucks, Ford Focus and Ford Cars > Ford Cars and PAG Vehicles > PAG Vehicle Discussion > Volvo



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
News from the North American Dealer Assoc. Stacy94PGT Ford Worldwide News 2 01-31-2003 15:34
Volvo R Cars: Refined Turbo Technology for Top Performance Intro in Paris Stacy94PGT Ford Worldwide News 1 09-28-2002 00:24
Pregnant dummy is old news, says GM Falchoon The Pub 3 06-26-2002 23:58
Volvo rounds the corner to a new styling direction Stacy94PGT Ford Worldwide News 1 06-25-2002 09:44
75 Years of Volvo Cars RPO83 Volvo 2 04-09-2002 02:16

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:42.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.