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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 03-21-05, 01:14 AM
AJG
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brush/roller painting question (ref Steven Hull probably!!)

I gloss-rollered my Range Rover and it came out quite good (very cheap
paint, very cold and damp weather. all done outside, miracle!!)
Two years later I'm about to redo using Tekaloid.
Has anyone had experience using Tekaloid and Owatrol (aka Flowrite,
Penetrol) as a paint additive? Any comments?

--
AndyG


 
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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 03-21-05, 01:14 AM
Stephen Hull
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Re: brush/roller painting question (ref Steven Hull probably!!)

In message <Xwk9JvLMEsMCFwS2@shedcity.demon.co.uk>
AJG <ND@nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>I gloss-rollered my Range Rover and it came out quite good (very cheap
>paint, very cold and damp weather. all done outside, miracle!!)
>Two years later I'm about to redo using Tekaloid.
>Has anyone had experience using Tekaloid and Owatrol (aka Flowrite,
>Penetrol) as a paint additive? Any comments?


I've never used Penatrol to retard the drying process, I sometimes add
RAW Linseed oil if a particular colour dries too fast or I work faster.
Although I appreciate this is not always possible.

Owatrol Penatrol "Oil" paint conditioner increases wet edge and working
time which also helps eliminate brushmarks.

Owatrol Floetrol "Emulsion" paint conditioner increases wet edge and
working time.

You may not need to use an additive with a roller but it will help if
you intend to "tip off" with a brush after using a roller this will
elliminate the orange peel effect often left behind when using rollers.

Perhaps someone here who has used Penatrol can comment on how it
performs, I've usually just muddled through on problematic paint.

Steve.


--
Vehicle Painting Pointers: http://www.stephen.hull.btinternet.co.uk
Coach painting tips and techniques + Land Rover colour codes
Using a British RISC Operating System 100% immune to any Windows virus.
"Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble". Henry Royce
 
post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 03-21-05, 01:14 AM
Larry
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Re: brush/roller painting question (ref Steven Hull probably!!)

The only gripe I have with Tekaloid is that it takes an age to dry, and if
you drive off with it before it has solidified properly you will see all
sorts of interesting patterns appear.



--
Larry
Series 3 rust and holes


"AJG" <ND@nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Xwk9JvLMEsMCFwS2@shedcity.demon.co.uk...
> I gloss-rollered my Range Rover and it came out quite good (very cheap
> paint, very cold and damp weather. all done outside, miracle!!)
> Two years later I'm about to redo using Tekaloid.
> Has anyone had experience using Tekaloid and Owatrol (aka Flowrite,
> Penetrol) as a paint additive? Any comments?
>
> --
> AndyG



 
post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 03-21-05, 01:14 AM
Stephen Hull
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Re: brush/roller painting question (ref Steven Hull probably!!)

In message <39gdldF60glg0U1@individual.net>
"Larry" <NDA@larry-arnold.com> wrote:

>The only gripe I have with Tekaloid is that it takes an age to dry, and if
>you drive off with it before it has solidified properly you will see all
>sorts of interesting patterns appear.
>

The slow drying is intentional and absolutely necessary. It is what
makes the paint unique because slow drying paint helps eliminate
brushmarks and gives a longer window or open time for application,
although some colours do tend to dry faster than others depending on
the type of pigment or lakes used.
Tekaloid coach enamel is designed to give the painter the ultimate
finish when painting carriages or coaches, Giving the right conditions
no other paint AFAIK is suitable for the outstanding finish you get on
carriage work when the paint is applied by hand.

During the hand painting tradition which became popular around the 17th
century up until the early 20th century when all carriages and coaches
were painted in synthetic linseed oil lead based finishes the carriages
or vehicles were left to stand for a week at least in either a specially
prepared area or left outdoors to weather before being commissioned.
This in the trade was called the "flat" or standing off period which
you've probably heard of.

Of course synthetic paint dries from the outside in, even though the
outer finish may appear hard enough to touch the inner layers require
further drying hence the "flat" area to leave vehicles to dry
thoroughly.

However if you choose a slow drying pigment you can always add Terebine
driers to speed up the process although I tend to try not using
accelerators unless painting hidden areas like inner door panels etc.

Steve.


--
Vehicle Painting Pointers: http://www.stephen.hull.btinternet.co.uk
Coach painting tips and techniques + Land Rover colour codes
Using a British RISC Operating System 100% immune to any Windows virus.
"Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble". Henry Royce
 
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