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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2002 Ford E250 5.4l dedicated CNG van.
Currently sitting at 124,000 miles, it is pretty low mileage for a dedicated CNG vehicle. It has had some work done, and I'm happy with it when it runs right. But, right now I'm plagued with a rough running and very low fuel mileage vehicle, due to a fuel rail pressure sensor, or fuel injector pressure sensor. They are one in the same.
Now, apparently, Ford got a little creative around 2002, and decided to use a sensor that has been discontinued forever it seems. The original part number for the sensor is F8AF-9F972-AB. There are a very select few places that have this sensor, but it's a sensor that costs around $700. I'm just having nightmares about paying that much for a sensor.
So, here's the question. Is there an alternative around this? Right now what's happening is the engine is getting flooded with fuel. From stop, it is horribly sluggish. Once at highway speeds, it does well. I've learned that the ECU constantly reads this sensor and adjusts timing and performance based on the returned results of this sensor. But, my fuel rail pressure stays very constant, with no more than 2 or 3 psi fluctuations.
I can't be the only one who has had this problem. Any insight is appreciated
 

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I'm assuming that you read the pressure deflection through a gauge? have you hooked it up to a scanner that can read the sensor? You're probably not going to get around the price if you need to replace the sensor, but I do not know of a safe work around. When checking a sensor you either need to know the range of the output or what the computer is reading. If you have that value, you can compare it to another measuring device such as a gauge or thermometer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm assuming that you read the pressure deflection through a gauge? have you hooked it up to a scanner that can read the sensor? You're probably not going to get around the price if you need to replace the sensor, but I do not know of a safe work around. When checking a sensor you either need to know the range of the output or what the computer is reading. If you have that value, you can compare it to another measuring device such as a gauge or thermometer.
I haven't had it on a scanner yet. That's part of the problem, I'm not sure what the ecu is looking for from the sensor.
 
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