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Hi everyone just a quick question, I have a BA Fairlane G220 I had the front and rear lowered the shop measured it before and after while I watched, the left-hand side was about 2 cm higher than the driver's side from factory, they put Pedders springs in and it is still 2 centimetres higher on the passenger side, (the rear is spot on) I went back to the shop the installer said he has no idea why it was like that, there are no left and right marked springs for that particular vehicle, it annoys me and is doing my head in! does anybody know why it even came like this from the factory?
 

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Either or both the rear lower control arm or control blade assembly may be bent or deformed although more frequently the rear stabiliser bar is what gets bent or deformed. Checking this is covered in section 204-02a-6 of the factory workshop manual. The Ford factory workshop manuals for Australian Falcon etc can be downloaded from Ford for a small subscription fee at https://www.motorcraftservice.com/ The 72 hours at $21.95 will be more than enough time for what you need . You will need the BA Falcon Workshop manual as well as the Fairlane/LTD supplement. If sections appears missings it means they are unchanged from the previous model and you will need to download those sections as well. All pages are barcoded two individual subscribers to prevent copyright breaches so no sharing.
 

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Oops; sorry I missed it was the front rather than rear suspension. These larger vehicles are often used for towing so most problems happen at the rear. On the front the chassis can get bent if a jack is used under the front chassis crossmember (this is a big "no no" as it will bend especially under the extra weight of Fairlane especially if it is the V8). This is not uncommon as, despite the warning in the owners handbook and workshop manuals not to do so people and even some workshops see it center point as a convenient jacking point. This is most likely the cause of the issue. The front guards towers where the top of the coil over shocks mount can also flex or bend inward if the car has had a hard life (high km on corrugated roads) or has been in an accident. This can often be corrected by fitting a strut brace to push the wings back into alignmnet even though the car has double A arm with coilover shocks rather than strut suspension. Check the corner to corner dimensions of these items against the workshop manual specs. Also check the crossmember for cracks as this often follows after it is bent or sometimes at the same time. To emphasis, you should not lift from the central alloy cross member or the differential but just from the marked jack points on the sills. The car has an alloy cross member at the front can bend and even crack if used as a lifting point; while it might look beefy the alloy can bend rather easily if asked to carry too much weight at one point. The car also has IRS rather than a solid beam axle and you will also cause damage the differential mounts and other parts if you jack up the car under the differential.
 

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Oops; sorry I missed it was the front rather than rear suspension. These larger vehicles are often used for towing so most problems happen at the rear. On the front the chassis can get bent if a jack is used under the front chassis crossmember (this is a big "no no" as it will bend especially under the extra weight of Fairlane especially if it is the V8). This is not uncommon as, despite the warning in the owners handbook and workshop manuals not to do so people and even some workshops see it center point as a convenient jacking point. This is most likely the cause of the issue. The front guards towers where the top of the coil over shocks mount can also bend inward if the car has had a hard life or has been in an accident. Check the corner to corner dimensions of these items against the workshop manual specs. Also check the crossmember for cracks as this often follows after it is bent or sometimes at the same time. To emphasis, you should not lift from the central alloy cross member or the differential but just from the marked jack points on the sills. The car has an alloy cross member at the front can bend and even crack if used as a lifting point; while it might look beefy the alloy can bend rather easily if asked to carry too much weight. The car also has IRS rather than a solid beam axle and you will also cause damage the differential mounts and other parts if you jack up the car under the differential.
Thanks for your comprehensive reply that's what I was looking for, I have Jacked the front of the car up where I thought looked like a solid part of the chassis, if I took a photo pointing to where I used the Jack can you tell me if it was a no no or not please? The car drives dead straight doesn't pull to left or right so doesn't appear that anything is bent from driving it, wouldn't such a dramatic Bend be noticeable in the way the car drives?
 

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Oh and it's been jacked up the same amount of times since I've owned it in both spots on both sides so wouldn't both sides be the same if that makes sense?
 

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Thanks for your comprehensive reply that's what I was looking for, I have Jacked the front of the car up where I thought looked like a solid part of the chassis, if I took a photo pointing to where I used the Jack can you tell me if it was a no no or not please? The car drives dead straight doesn't pull to left or right so doesn't appear that anything is bent from driving it, wouldn't such a dramatic Bend be noticeable in the way the car drives?
Sorry; to be the bearer of bad news but that sounds like you have used and bent the alloy cross member. Yes it looks beefy but if you test it with a magnet you will see it is alloy and will bend under the weight of you nearly three ton vehicle if it is used as a jacking point. It may be still be safe despite the impact on the suspension alignment if nothing has cracked but do check for cracks (and do so periodically) as having one of these break, as sometimes then happens, while you are driving along can be somewhat catastrophic.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's the exact same place where they lift it on a hoist in a workshop!!
 

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Oh and it's been jacked up the same amount of times since I've owned it in both spots on both sides so wouldn't both sides be the same if that makes sense?
No; sorry. Yes; it may drive OK as corrections through wheel alignment and camber and caster adjustments can correct for the bend. But the more often it is jacked on the alloy cross member the more it will bend, fatigue, crack and finally break. The force will be applied upwards on both sides so it wont compensate but just bend what is essentially a formed alloy bar bend more.
 

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No; sorry. Yes; it may drive OK as corrections through wheel alignment and camber and caster adjustments can correct for the bend. But the more often it is jacked on the alloy cross member the more it will bend, fatigue, crack and finally break. The force will be applied upwards on both sides so it wont compensate but just bend what is essentially a formed alloy bar bend more.
I'm not anywhere near the cross member mate I jack it up on the chassis where they put it on the hoist in a workshop for instance
 

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It's the exact same place where they lift it on a hoist in a workshop!!
OK that's the chassis rails and that's considerably safer. It's the alloy bar under the front of the engine you need to especially avoid. However; those chassis can also get crushed (especially if there is any corrosion) and sometimes do lifting the considerable weight of you vehicle and if you look at the owners manual and Section 100-02-2 of the factory workshop manual you will see that the only recommended and approved the jacking and hoist lifting points are the marked sill panel indentations. It also worth buying some deep grooved hockey puck jack pad so you don't bent or damage the sill panels at the approved lift points. This sort of thing: Car Rubber Jack Pad Frame Protector Guard Adapter Jack Disk Pad Tools jack pad | eBay Of course a previous owner or naive workshop may have also jacked the car from the center of the alloy cross member leading to the spring height variations.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Look at the photo the cross member is at the end of the blue line i
20200612_113104.jpg
Jack it up where my finger is pointing to
52153
 

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99.99% of the time you will get away with using those chassis rails but there is the other 0'01% of times when you wont. One of my (likely much heavier) NC Fairlane 5 liter V8's chassis rails collapsed while I watched in horror in the reception area of a tyre fitters while I was getting new tyres. I think they just tried to lift it too quickly. Lucky it was a low lift hoist and the car was only a foot or so off the ground so there was no other significant damage other that the hoist lift pad then slipping off and pushing the passengers' side foot well in a little (fixed with a few judicious blows from a rubber mallet). The tyre shop (or their insurers) had the rails welded up but despite applying a lot of zinc spray etc corrosion set in there and that eventually killed the car.
 

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Yeah I have jacked it up there as well
Lifting there will almost always bend it... even if just eventually; the heavier the car, more often it is lifted there and the longer you leave the car suspended on the alloy member the greater the risk and amount of damage. Some Falcon owners claim to do it regularly albeit they do spread the load by putting a large piece of timber under the full length of the cross member between the jack or car lift. Others have done it just once and bent it the first time. The extra weight of the Fairlane just adds to the risk.
 

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Just Google "ford falcon bent alloy crossmember jacking" if you still have doubts. And read your owner's handbook and the factory workshop manual sections covering jacking and lifting; there were good reasons why the Ford engineers emphasised using only the designated sill lifting points.
 

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I have spoken to a Ford technician those little flimsy let's call them "slivers" of Steel where the Jack with the slot goes, he would not lift the whole car on all four corners using those points on a hoist because they would be flattened out immediately, those points are for the factory Jack that winds up with the handle the slot on the top of the Jack goes there there is actually no pressure put on those points the pressure goes on either side of that point it's just where it slots into the jack to stop the Jack slipping. when the vehicle is put onto a hoist they put them on I think it's called the chassis rail where I was pointing earlier,
 

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No accredited Australian Ford Technician that worked on any vehicle from the AU onward would tell you that. Earlier vehicles such as the EA to EL series did actually have additional marked ridged reinforced jacking and lifting points adjacent to the sills that were recommended for use with car lifts. The later model ute models also have a designated lift point that is part of the front of the rear leaf spring hanger. Download the official Ford factory workshop manual for the BA Fairlane and LTD at the link previously provided and read section 100-02-1. It will confirm what I have told you and that the only approved lifting points are on the sill panels. Your owners handbook, if you have one,will say the same thing. You can buy adapter to safely use a trolley jack or car lift at those points e.g. Auto Lift Parts - Square Rubber Replacement Arm Pads for Hoist - Set of 4 | eBay and Car Slotted Frame Rail Floor Jack Adapter Lift Rubber Holder Stand HOT Pad J5P1 | eBay and 1PC Car Aluminum Grooved Magnetic Jack Pad Jacking Rail Adapter (Orange) | eBay so the sill is not damaged and that's what I and true Ford technicians use. Perhaps this alloy crossmember will fit and it's claimed to be straight and undamaged Ford Falcon BA BF XR8 Crossmember Boss 260 290 FPV Pursuit V8 | eBay
 
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