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Hi there, I have a 54 f100 with 302 Windsor forged internals, cammed and oversize carburettor. The engine was built to go in a track car so driving it around town is fouling up the plugs (BCPR6ES ngk). Any suggestions or ideas around this would be much appreciated
 

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The full size image wont load for me but it looks to be running very rich. Have you tried adjusting the carb yet?
 

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I don't know why our system rejected that image but I managed to get a screenshot of it.

Could be running too rich, spark plug heat range is too cold or a weak spark to the plugs.

Has it been missing?

 

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Running far too rich . Some other possible causes of that fault could be carb jetting sizes , float level , air filter , timing , restriction on exhaust assembly , choke sticking ( if manual choke ) or carb set up .
 

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the first thing you do is get rid of those plugs. Put in Champions. N.G.K.'s are known
as No Good Krap. Don't waste you money on E-3 plugs either. There is too much erratic
spark between 3 different negative electrodes causing a lag time. These plugs did not test well.
 

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Why do you say NGK’s are crap? A lot of mustang guys run them and I believe theyre stock replacements on at least some Toyotas.

Either way those plugs will need to be replaced with all that crap on them.
 

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NGK's are OEM on many new cars today. Mostly foreign though same as NGK.

Personally I don't have a problem with them but when its time to replace but I always go with something else.

Chip is correct, a lot of problems with multiple ground electrode ((Bosch)) plugs causing misfire conditions on some vehicles.
 

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N.G.K's were made specifically for European cars and small engines and home generators.
They are very proprietor. They work well in a bike, but not in a snowmobile. They work well in a little generator but not in a snow blower. I raced snowmobiles professionally
for 6 years. N.G.K. plugs had one miss fire and you were done. You lost a cylinder.
Bosch plugs faired much better. Mustang guy running N.G.K. ! They just don't know any better or they get the plugs for free. Most I know run Motor Craft or Champion. And yes in our shop we sold them all. Had many returned N.G.K. and Bosch plugs that didn't work well in a north American car. Exp. You don't put A.C. Delco plugs in a Ford. If you do you might get 500 miles.
 

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^ Likewise used them all in w/shop .Autolite was another make .Some makes made different engines run like shit . Looking at the picture of the fouled plug reminded me of when we used to clean the plugs in the Champion plug machine that blasted them with sand , then cleaned threads with wire brush on the bench grinder .We used to have to clean them at a 6000 mile service and replace at 12000 mls , changed days .Probably a lot wont know what a plug cleaning machine was nowadays .Was also good for cleaning / drying plugs on flooded engines Good old days then .
 

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I've seen one. Was a Champion brand metal box type that the plug would go in the top under a metal shield and there was a door at the bottom that housed the bag. Never seen one in action but the old man that taught me had one on his work bench.
 

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I've seen one. Was a Champion brand metal box type that the plug would go in the top under a metal shield and there was a door at the bottom that housed the bag. Never seen one in action but the old man that taught me had one on his work bench.
That's the type , you could get free standing or bench model without legs .You could screw the plug in after cleaning , hook up lead and test for sparking .You increased the amount of electricity to the plug by turning the wheel on the right . You could catch some apprentices ( me included ) to hold it and give them a jolt of electricity . :grin2:

THBCSPT01 champion spark plug tester - Trevor Howsam Limited
 

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N.G.K's were made specifically for European cars and small engines and home generators.
They are very proprietor. They work well in a bike, but not in a snowmobile. They work well in a little generator but not in a snow blower. I raced snowmobiles professionally
for 6 years. N.G.K. plugs had one miss fire and you were done. You lost a cylinder.
Bosch plugs faired much better. Mustang guy running N.G.K. ! They just don't know any better or they get the plugs for free. Most I know run Motor Craft or Champion. And yes in our shop we sold them all. Had many returned N.G.K. and Bosch plugs that didn't work well in a north American car. Exp. You don't put A.C. Delco plugs in a Ford. If you do you might get 500 miles.
Many many mustang guys run tr6 and tr7 plugs in stock and high hp combinations. So I doubt theyre bad plugs.

Ive actually had a bad experience with ford racing plugs where most of them had the insulator detach and rattle around. Luckily I caught it before I installed them. Now Im running Brisk Racing 1 piece plugs in my 07 gt.
 

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used those plug machines many times. Had one in the shop. They actually found out it did more damage than good. The sand blast took off the hardened porcelain glaze form the center electrode making it foul faster, collect soot and short to ground. Back then
snowmobile engine manuals stated never clean the plugs with a plug cleaner as there could be traces of sand still trapped in the plug that could enter the cylinder. Usually the
rule of thumb is if the plug is dirty enough to be cleaned it is dirty enough to be replaced.
The little wheel on the side was connected to the air line. There was a pressure gauge that
blew onto the plug while testing. It was used to simulate cylinder compression. you turned up the air pressure until the air blew the spark out then you looked at the chart to see if the plug passed the sparking test. Yes I'm old. I grew up in the flathead era. Still
have one. Oh Ya. You could actually buy a small home style plug cleaner complete with little sand bag and air connection. I have one. It's a wall hanger. Still works.
 

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Your machine must have been different from ours .We only had the air connection at the left hand side .The lever on the left went back towards you to sand blast the plug and the other way to air blast it after cleaning . You pushed and held the button on the centre to get spark at plug after screwing it in the threaded hole beside black wheel and increased it by turning wheel and checking reading on the gauge . The holes on the r/hand side held spare rubbers for where the plug fitted for testing as they tended to wear out after time with the abrasive .Ours had no way to simulate cylinder compression
In the 60s it was part of the service schedule for all the cars in our dealership franchise to clean and gap the plugs at 6000 and replace at 12000 and there was never the same demand on the plugs in our engines back then as today .I always had cleaned , spare sets in toolbox for breakdown callouts and still have to this day .
 

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Looking at the pictures in close up there appears to be another air outlet on the right hand side and down from where the plug screwed in there is a vacant hole .Could be that was the difference with our machine and they had the option of pressure testing which we didn't have on ours . You Yanks had far better garage equipment and tooling than us in those days .
 

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To the OP..........


Wilder than stock cams make the idle speed necessarily go up due to more overlap diluting the mixture with exhaust (the loping thing). Meaning the carb is open too far at idle to let the transfer slots or holes lay open to feed the normally only greater than idle fuel they give. It sends the plug to full rich depending on how much low rpm use the motor gets on the street.

Pull carb and see if anything like the slot or holes is showing below the edge of butterflies as set presently for your idle. Disregard the one hole way below butterfly that shows even with them 100% closed-that is your curb idle discharge location and it alone has to be open at idle to feed the purely dead idle only fuel. The other holes even with butterfly edge CANNOT show, correct has them just under the edge show that they show instantly ONLY as soon as the throttle is worked to come away from idle. Those other holes serve as miniature accelerator pumps to supply fuel ONLY while the throttle is working to open and NOT with it sitting still like pure idle. As a result they feed pretty rich and them leaking past butterfly is commonly why so many hot engines have idling/fouling issues.

The fix is simple but customizes the carb to that engine only. You jacked the idle speed higher to get AIR but you got too much fuel with it, you need AIR only. You back the throttles back up to cover the holes or slots and then carefully drill small holes, one in each butterfly close to that edge of the plate to allow more air ONLY with the throttles still backed off. Start at 1/16" or smaller and gradually get bigger, the idle speed will increase with each drilling and you stop when your speed is where you want it. Now as well, the carb fuel holes are back where they need to be, just exposing as soon as the throttles are opened and the lean out at pure idle will greatly clean your plugs up.

Another way I used to do it was again back the carb back down to correct on the holes and then add air via extra like vacuum lines into say PCV air supply to lean it out more, may need more than one line and use like aquarium air valves to throttle each line back to get just the extra air only you need to increase the idle speed back to where you need.

At our high-perf garage back in the day I used to do that stuff to engines all day long.
 
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