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Discussion Starter #1
I've been experiencing a shaking steering wheel that comes and goes when driving above 80km/h and has been occurring more frequently over the past 18 months.

I've uploaded a video of it happening to YouTube - you can see the steering wheel shaking and the sound that it makes (hopefully the video makes more sense than me trying to explain it). Video link: https://youtu.be/5LvSn82lxQA
  • The shaking mainly happens around speeds of 100 - 110 km/h and a few times around 80 km/h.
  • Sometimes it lasts 30s and sometimes 5+ minutes and it can go away by itself.
  • It can also go away if I increase/decrease speed or come to a complete stop (eg at traffic lights - it doesn't occur when I accelerate afterwards).
I've had wheel alignments, the wheels balanced and rotated a couple times, and it still happens. Not sure if this could be related, but it started occurring about six months after I got four new tyres put on.

Has anyone had anything similar or have any ideas what could be causing it?
 

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Check none of the tyres is twisted / deformed and spin wheels to check for any buckles , run outs
 

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Check the adjustment of master cylinder push rod behind the brake pedal. When the brake booster heats up the rod inside pushes into the reservoir causing the brakes to engage. This is a fairly common issue with this model. Try braking slightly when it happens and see if that changes the behavior. If so it tend to confirm it's push rod adjustment. If so to adjust as per this video
and
or as follows:
1) Undo the two nuts at the base of the master cylinder that hold it onto the brake booster. Once they are off just grab the entire master cylinder and pull it out of the booster enough to lower it with enough room to adjust the rod. Make sure you do it slowly so you don't bend the brake lines too much. You just need to move the master cylinder out of the way just enough to be able to adjust the rod.

2) Once thee master cylinder is out of the way you'll see a rod inside the hole of the booster where the master cylinder came out of. Grab this rod with your fingers or pliers and pull it out so it's past point of the booster flsuh withn the end of the booster. You will be able to see its bolt head top where it screws out (left) to push on the master cylinder more or screws in (right) to push on the master cylinder less. You will be able to see where the rod thread is so just below the thread where it screws in, grab some vice grips or similar and lock them onto the part of the rod that is stationary where the bolt screws in. Once you're at this point your vice grips should be locked onto the shaft and pretty much resting on the booster as you don't want to pull it too far out. Now get an 8mm socket and ratchet. Mark the top of the bolt head and while holding the vice grips still, screw the bolt head in(right) until the mark goes around twice (or two full turns).

3) Remove the vice grips and put the master cylinder back in tightening the two nuts that hold it on. Start the car and make sure the brakes are working correctly before driving anywhere then also road test to check the brakes are working and the vibration has gone.

Also see
The brake booster rod adjustment issue is the common and likely cause of this issue but it might also be front wheel bearings, control arms or ball joints so it the braking test doesn't suggest it's this, jack up the car and try and shake and wobble each wheel by hand while holding at the 12 O'clock and 6 O'Clock positions to check for this (they should not be able to be moved by hand except for their normal steering turning motion).
 
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