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Will a roller cam assembly ground for a 289 work for a 302 Cleveland engine? Are the rocker arm ratios the same?
 

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First, I'm far from an expert, but I'll tell you what I've been told. If you truly have a Cleveland 302, what you have is a rare breed. A 302 Cleveland is a 302 Windsor block with Cleveland heads. To match them, the water ports are modified/ground to make them mate. This SHOULD mean that the cam shaft should have geometries that match a Windsor cam shaft, lift and rocker arm ratios SHOULD be compatible. What I don't know is if the firing orders are the same.I went looking and no one has a good answer for that. My suggestion, determine the firing order, if they match, reassemble like it's a custom build using Plastigage (or equivalent) to determine clearance.
 

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Will a roller cam assembly ground for a 289 work for a 302 Cleveland engine? Are the rocker arm ratios the same?
CatSkinner got it WRONG:

The 302 Cleveland is a destroked 351C that was produced in Australia. Ford of Australia uses the marketing term "Boss" differently than it is used in the USA, and the number placed after that term (in Australian engines) refers to the rated kW output of the engine; this is easily visible in modern "Modular" V8 engines.

Getting back to the 302C: it has the exact same block as a 351C, and it uses true Cleveland-style water passages. Deck height is nominally 9.206; bore space is 4.380, bore is 4.000, stroke is 3.000 (same as the 302W and the "Boss 302"). The "Boss 302" (in which "302" refers to the cubic inches of volume swept by the pistons) is part of the Windsor family of engines, despite the Cleveland-style valvetrain, because it uses the Windsor block, timing cover and coolant-passage design.

Ford used a variety of 302-cube configurations featuring a "stock" nominal bore of 4.000 inches (101.60 mm), and a "stock" nominal stroke of 3.000 inches (76.20 mm) in a block having a bore space of 4.380-inches; to wit:
  1. 302W = Deck height is nominally 8.206 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.090 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.60:1, with inline valves
    1. Boss 302 = Deck height is nominally 8.201-8.211 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.150 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.73:1, with canted valves
    2. 302W-TA (racing-only) = Deck height is nominally 8.206 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.315 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.60:1, with inline valves
    3. Boss 302-TA (racing-only) = Deck height is nominally 8.201-8.211 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.315 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.73:1, with canted valves
    4. ALL of the above engines are in the Windsor family, in the low-deck branch; ALL have separable timing covers and Windsor-pattern coolant flow
  2. 302C = Deck height is nominally 9.206 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 6.020 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.73:1, with canted valves
    1. The 302C was produced only in Australia, is in the Cleveland engine family, in the low-deck branch; it has an integrated timing cover and Cleveland-pattern coolant flow
As far as camshaft-interchange goes, the front journal diameter would seem to make that a "no" (with the caveat that, given unlimited money and time, just about anything is technically possible).

If you're serious about a camshaft swap, contact the people at (a) Bullet Cams, or (b) Competition Cams or (c) Lunati; tell them what you have and what you're trying to achieve, and (for surprisingly little money) they'll make you a camshaft that will surpass just about any reasonable expectation you might have had; the "a, b & c" reflect my personal order of preference -- ymmv.
 

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CatSkinner got it WRONG:

The 302 Cleveland is a destroked 351C that was produced in Australia. Ford of Australia uses the marketing term "Boss" differently than it is used in the USA, and the number placed after that term (in Australian engines) refers to the rated kW output of the engine; this is easily visible in modern "Modular" V8 engines.

Getting back to the 302C: it has the exact same block as a 351C, and it uses true Cleveland-style water passages. Deck height is nominally 9.206; bore space is 4.380, bore is 4.000, stroke is 3.000 (same as the 302W and the "Boss 302"). The "Boss 302" (in which "302" refers to the cubic inches of volume swept by the pistons) is part of the Windsor family of engines, despite the Cleveland-style valvetrain, because it uses the Windsor block, timing cover and coolant-passage design.

Ford used a variety of 302-cube configurations featuring a "stock" nominal bore of 4.000 inches (101.60 mm), and a "stock" nominal stroke of 3.000 inches (76.20 mm) in a block having a bore space of 4.380-inches; to wit:
  1. 302W = Deck height is nominally 8.206 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.090 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.60:1, with inline valves
    1. Boss 302 = Deck height is nominally 8.201-8.211 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.150 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.73:1, with canted valves
    2. 302W-TA (racing-only) = Deck height is nominally 8.206 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.315 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.60:1, with inline valves
    3. Boss 302-TA (racing-only) = Deck height is nominally 8.201-8.211 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 5.315 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.73:1, with canted valves
    4. ALL of the above engines are in the Windsor family, in the low-deck branch; ALL have separable timing covers and Windsor-pattern coolant flow
  2. 302C = Deck height is nominally 9.206 inches; connecting rod length (between centers) is 6.020 inches; OE rocker ratio is nominally 1.73:1, with canted valves
    1. The 302C was produced only in Australia, is in the Cleveland engine family, in the low-deck branch; it has an integrated timing cover and Cleveland-pattern coolant flow
As far as camshaft-interchange goes, the front journal diameter would seem to make that a "no" (with the caveat that, given unlimited money and time, just about anything is technically possible).

If you're serious about a camshaft swap, contact the people at (a) Bullet Cams, or (b) Competition Cams or (c) Lunati; tell them what you have and what you're trying to achieve, and (for surprisingly little money) they'll make you a camshaft that will surpass just about any reasonable expectation you might have had; the "a, b & c" reflect my personal order of preference -- ymmv.
What skinner said is correct for a Boss 302 which by looking at the username may be the right answer to the question.
I'm guessing it may be a term thats used for the Boss engine but your post has the right details for an actual 302C.
 
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