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After reading that a carbon fibre tailshaft cost about $600 and having been quoted $1200 for an aluminium tail shaft .. I wonder if they make the for early model ( XA of course ! ) fords?? What sort of HP/torque can they handle?? ver curious as I have had nothing but troubles with my tail shaft and have spent heaps on it and seem to be getting no where
 

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The carbon fibre tailshafts on the EL GT is an aluminium tail shaft as fitted to EL XR8 wrapped in carbon fibre I think can any one conferm.
 

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Yes the ELGT was an ally shaft wrapped in carbonfibre so this book says... I tend to like the idea that if it was to disintergrate you dont end up catapaulting across the highway
 

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I recall reading a piece on transmission and related components in 5.0 Mustang a while back that a company could make up custom carbon fibre tailshafts. The cost was in the range of US $500 - 600 from memory. I'll dig up the details and list the manufacturer when I get a chance.

Interesting to note that the carbon fibre versions do give a small performance improvement over metal tailshafts due to how they respond to the twisting from the power of the engine. Sort of like a rubber band twisting back into its original shape after it has be wound up and then let go. Anyway I'll try to post the actual piece for reference.
 

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Here is the excerpt from the article I promised. It comes from the Aug 2000 issue of 5.0 Mustang.

High Fibre Diet

Yes we all know the Precision Shaft Technology carbo-fiber driveshaft is expensive but you usually do get what you pay for. In our case, we had to have a shorter driveshaft built for the T56 swap. As such, the costs of having a custom aluminum unit built somewhat mitigate the difference of jumping up to carbon fiber. Obviously, carbon fiber is lighter, which means less roating mass and more power to the rear wheels, but is that reason enough to step up?

Well, when Paul Svinicki of Paul's High Performance dyno'd a carbon fiber 'shaft on his '98 Cobra it was good for 17 horses at the rear wheels.

Paul's car also helps answer the question of durability; he's got hundreds of passes on his shaft without incident. Other high-powered believers in PST's shafts are Matt and Jay Scranton. They picked up 0.012 in the quarter-mile by by changing to the carbon fiber shaft. That might not sound like much, but every little drop is worth it in Pro 5.0. PST's Mark Velhuis says the carbon fiber shafts also help 60-foot times because they store energy like a nylon rope.

"The driveshaft has a different torsional spring rate than any metal driveshaft. We can vary that spring rate by changing the wind angles in the shaft," Mark says. "On a drag-racing application, it helps with the 60-foot because it twists up a little bit, and once the moment of inertia is overcome it returns 100 percent of the power because it has zero memory. Ametal driveshaft eventually takes a set and robs horsepower every time.

Mark says the carbo shafts eally help driveability on manual -transmission cars, as they dampen high-speed vibrations- so much so the Scrantons first thought the clutch was slipping because the tranny shifted so smoothly. So, if you have he money, or you've already got every other goodie on your car and you want more, a carbon-fiber driveshaft will give you an edge.
 
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