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I have an 11 p71 thats flex fuel tried e85 once. Horrible preformance and power overall not so good of experience. I don't understand why? Anyone running full e85 on there vics? Am I doing it wrong? Or do I need to upgrade things even tho it comes factory flex fuel ? Do I need bigger injectors or? If anyone could help me or tell me what needs to be done or what u did for your setup it would help out alot .
 

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2000 grand marquis ls with handling package, magnaflow mufflers,dual exhaust, 3.55 rear axle
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I have an 11 p71 thats flex fuel tried e85 once. Horrible preformance and power overall not so good of experience. I don't understand why? Anyone running full e85 on there vics? Am I doing it wrong? Or do I need to upgrade things even tho it comes factory flex fuel ? Do I need bigger injectors or? If anyone could help me or tell me what needs to be done or what u did for your setup it would help out alot .
Just use real gasoline. Problem solved. Save the corn for starving people somewhere.
 

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E85 was a stop gap measure to begin with, it can be used in performance applications when tuned for. On a stock tune the only gain you’ll get is a larger hole in your wallet from spending more money on it lol.


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Ethanol is grain alcohol, same thing people drink and use to get drunk (but don't drink e85 or pure Ethanol if you want to live). It can (and is) be used in internal combustion engines, burns much cleaner, virtually eliminates carbon buildup in engines, and yields much lower emission levels. It is produced from a wide variety of plant materials which are very renewable resources. Engines using pure alcohol have problems starting, especially in cold weather, so E85 is 85% alcohol blended with 15% gasoline to make cold-weather starting easier. In most countries and regions of the world, E85 is the fuel of choice. However, especially in North America, because E85 produces less power in any given engine compared to gasoline, it is rarely used. Gasoline produces huge amounts of air pollution, causes serious carbon deposits inside engines and fouls engine oil, but americans don't care: They want power, and all they can get, and they want it now, so they buy and use gasoline.
As a side note, Ethanol can degrade many common plastics and polymer-based materials, such as tubes and hoses, so use of E-85 is recommend only in vehicles equipped with components unaffected by Ethanol, and such vehicles are always labeled E85 where fuel is put into the tank. And if you put E85 in your vehicle, do so only when the fuel tank is empty or has been previously completely filled with E85.
You may want to view some of the many videos and documents available on the subject, such as:
 

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2000 grand marquis ls with handling package, magnaflow mufflers,dual exhaust, 3.55 rear axle
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Ethanol is grain alcohol, same thing people drink and use to get drunk (but don't drink e85 or pure Ethanol if you want to live). It can (and is) be used in internal combustion engines, burns much cleaner, virtually eliminates carbon buildup in engines, and yields much lower emission levels. It is produced from a wide variety of plant materials which are very renewable resources. Engines using pure alcohol have problems starting, especially in cold weather, so E85 is 85% alcohol blended with 15% gasoline to make cold-weather starting easier. In most countries and regions of the world, E85 is the fuel of choice. However, especially in North America, because E85 produces less power in any given engine compared to gasoline, it is rarely used. Gasoline produces huge amounts of air pollution, causes serious carbon deposits inside engines and fouls engine oil, but americans don't care: They want power, and all they can get, and they want it now, so they buy and use gasoline.
As a side note, Ethanol can degrade many common plastics and polymer-based materials, such as tubes and hoses, so use of E-85 is recommend only in vehicles equipped with components unaffected by Ethanol, and such vehicles are always labeled E85 where fuel is put into the tank. And if you put E85 in your vehicle, do so only when the fuel tank is empty or has been previously completely filled with E85.
You may want to view some of the many videos and documents available on the subject, such as:
Since E85 is by its definition a mixture of alcohol and gasoline then if seems that it is ok to mix them. Can you explain then, why you would need to wait until the tank is empty to use E85?
 

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Since E85 is by its definition a mixture of alcohol and gasoline then if seems that it is ok to mix them. Can you explain then, why you would need to wait until the tank is empty to use E85?
The answer is really very simple. In E85 (flex-fuel) vehicles, ECU's are not equipped as a test lab, and they cannot determine the percentage of alcohol in the fuel.
Therefore, ECU's are programmed with 2 modes of fuel operation: A and B. A might be the fuel/air/timing parameters for gasoline, B might be the fuel/air/timing parameters for E85. The difference in parameters can be significant for a given engine (and can also change the parameters of transmission operation).
If you mix 50/50, or any other unusual fuel mix percentage, the ECU will default to gasoline settings and the engine will not run very well.
If the sensors can detect fuel representative of E85, the ECU kicks into E85 mode and makes the necessary adjustments.
So if want to use gas, use gas. If you want to use E85, go ahead but use E85 and not some hybrid random mixture. That will definitely cause car engines to run like a Briggs and Stratton law mower engine. (You know, like sputter, kick, bang, and quit)
 

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2000 grand marquis ls with handling package, magnaflow mufflers,dual exhaust, 3.55 rear axle
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The answer is really very simple. In E85 (flex-fuel) vehicles, ECU's are not equipped as a test lab, and they cannot determine the percentage of alcohol in the fuel.
Therefore, ECU's are programmed with 2 modes of fuel operation: A and B. A might be the fuel/air/timing parameters for gasoline, B might be the fuel/air/timing parameters for E85. The difference in parameters can be significant for a given engine (and can also change the parameters of transmission operation).
If you mix 50/50, or any other unusual fuel mix percentage, the ECU will default to gasoline settings and the engine will not run very well.
If the sensors can detect fuel representative of E85, the ECU kicks into E85 mode and makes the necessary adjustments.
So if want to use gas, use gas. If you want to use E85, go ahead but use E85 and not some hybrid random mixture. That will definitely cause car engines to run like a Briggs and Stratton law mower engine. (You know, like sputter, kick, bang, and quit)
Thanks for the reply. I had assumed that the computer could adapt to the percentage of alcohol but now understand the problem of mixing them. Thanks for your excellent explanation.
 
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