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Aligning the sixth-generation Mustang is not that different from some of Ford’s other products, but you do have additional steps that involve the electric power steering and inspecting the camera and radar systems.


The sixth-generation Ford Mustang is the first to have independent rear suspension. In addition, the front suspension was a complete redesign from earlier versions. Aligning this Mustang is not that different from some of Ford’s other products, but you do have additional steps that involve the electric power steering and inspecting the camera and radar systems.
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Front Suspension
2015 Ford Mustang Front Suspension
The front suspension uses a MacPherson strut and two lower control links. The camber is adjustable by installing cam bolts in the upper strut bolt hole. This should allow for plus or minus 1.75 degrees of camber adjustment.
The 2015 Mustang Front Suspension
Caster is not adjustable. If you see the caster is out of alignment, it could be a sign of damage to the subframe or control arms.
Rear Suspension
2015 Ford Mustang Rear Suspension
As the first generation of Mustangs with an independent rear suspension, the design is complex with four elements attaching the rear knuckle to the body and other links.
The goal of Mustang’s engineers was to improve handling and traction, so owners do not lose control while leaving a car show. The suspension includes what Ford calls an integral link that attaches to the lower trailing arm and the knuckle. The link is designed to hold the knuckle upright when power is applied to the rear wheels, preventing unpredictable and dangerous wheel hop.
2015 Ford Mustang Rear Toe Link
The toe is adjustable with a link under the lower trailing arm. The eccentric is on the outboard side of the link. Make sure the toe and thrust angle are very close to the specifications because ignoring them now can make the post-alignment calibration procedures much more difficult.
Camber is adjusted using a factory-installed eccentric on the upper control link. If the customer has lowered his or her Mustang, there are aftermarket adjustable links that can correct up to three degrees of negative camber and two degrees of positive camber.
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Steering
The Mustang uses electric power steering. The system uses an electric motor coupled to the steering rack by a toothed belt. The steering angle is computed with position sensors on the motor, angle sensor on the column, and data from the ABS module.
Mustang Electric Power Steering
The PSCM uses a temperature sensor to monitor the internal temperature of the EPAS gear –this DTC appearing by itself does not indicate a fault condition in the steering system. If the system detects higher than normal temperatures, codes will be set in the EPAS module and ABS module in some cases.
Diagnose all other EPAS DTCs before aligning the vehicle. Overheating can be caused by a missing heatshield, heavy loads (low-speed maneuvers) or high ambient temperatures.
An example of a heavy load would be multiple parking lot maneuvers over a short duration of time with low tire pressure or towing for long distances, followed by multiple parking maneuvers.
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When performing a toe adjustment in the front, check the data for the steering angle sensor. It should be at zero degrees. If not, a calibration procedure needs to be performed.
ADAS Features
The 2015 Ford Mustang is equipped with automatic braking and adaptive cruise control. The system uses a camera and radar mounted behind the grill. If the messages “Front Sensor Not Aligned” or “Adaptive Cruise Not Available” are displayed in the instrument cluster, you need to perform the calibration procedure.
First, inspect the radar sensor at the front of the Mustang, behind the bumper cover on the left side. Inspect around the bumper cover for evidence of a collision. If the sensor is not damaged, clear the codes. The calibration process requires just a test drive in a target-rich environment. Once the system has detected 250 targets it will turn off the warning message in the instrument cluster. This procedure must be performed in one key cycle. If the messages do not turn off during the test drive, check for codes.
 

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The new Mustangs are great handlers. Motor Trend twice choose a Mustang GT 350 (one year it was the R spec car) as runner up best driver's car in the world behind a mega-bucks McLaren. But, they are very sensitive to alignment. I have camber plates on my 350 R and set neg camber on track day to keep as much front rubber on the ground as possible. Rear toe is also sensitive. The car will "rear steer", follow ruts and just generally feel "squirrely" if the rear alignment is not spot on. I installed GT 350 toe links on my '17 GT to help keep the rear end from passing the front. The stock Pirellis that came with the GT were not confidence inspiring either. I blew one (tread separation, Pirelli refused to warranty it without the whole tire) when the car was but a month old and replaced them all with Michelin PS4's. Love the Michelin's. The Pirelli's make good tomato planters.
 

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Handling is sometimes subjective and I don't often have a chance to do a back to back tire comparison of new tires on the same car. However, I noticed a "night and day" difference in handling between the Pirellis and Michelins. The Pirellis would break away early and without warning where the Michelin's stick like glue and are predictable. But regardless of handling, I would not buy a tire from a manufacturer who does not back their product. I have TPS monitoring on my dash, am very conscious of tire condition and air pressure (have compressed air in the shop and check all tires frequently) and had just glanced at the pressure before getting on the freeway. I watched the tread peel away in my rear view mirror, yet the psychic Pirelli rep said it must have been low air pressure without even looking at what was left of the tire on the rim. He would not discuss the matter further without examining the tire. That's OK, I had better things to do to, and to require, or even to ask, a customer to retrieve tire pieces from the freeway to present them for warranty is pretty outrageous, not to mention illegal (California Vehicle code). Any product can fail, but how you treat a customer is a good indication of what kind of company you are. Additionally, it's hard to put a price on confidence in your tires. I have several cars with Michelins and never a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Having TPMS on all our family cars for a few years now is a God send in preventing female members of family driving off with a flat / punctured / low pressure tyre and ruining the sidewall on a good few occasions ( o.k me also ).

I ran a tyre / exhaust depot for a year ( many a tale of that experience ) and trying to impress some people the importance of having good tyres was often fruitless . I've drummed it in to my family to never skimp on tyres .

Years later in my workshop , we had a customer complaining about his steering and we checked everything out Full geometry check , steering , suspension , pressures all fine . We told him so and that it was the make of tyres .He would not believe me . He mentioned that he had driven a colleagues same car and it was like night and day Fortunately it was a Rank Xerox car that I had the fleet service contract on . I phoned the transport manager friend at Xerox and found the car he had driven was in the car park as the salesman / engineer was in the office all that day . He sent it up and we swapped the wheels which had a different make of tyres and sent the complainer out for a road test . On his return he held his hands up and apologised for doubting me.

The same happened with a very good friend who bought a new set of tyres also and came in not long after doing so saying something was not right with car handling . Different make of tyres again was the answer . A lot of people think they are just " rubber rings " , not so .
 

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Absolutely! And ditto regarding females and tires, probably the most important safety related items on the vehicle. Ahh, tires that is!
 
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