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Discussion Starter #1
I recently had my F250 in for service to replace the EGR cooler. While they were working on this, they broke a bolt that held the EGR pipe on the manifold. They couldn't get the bolt out so they had to replace the entire manifold. I was told I was responsible for the labor and the cost of the new manifold even though they broke the bolt. To me this doesn't seem right. Is this a common practice for the customer to pay for mistakes the service department makes? If it is, then there is no incentive for the service department to be extra careful with anything they are working on if the cost always go back to the customer.
 

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If it was caused by negligence on their behalf , you could claim . If on the other hand the bolt was seized due to rust , wear , heat , age or any other reason and was unable to be removed prior to breaking , as is often the case , it's down to you . Very hard for you to prove negligence I'm afraid . Some sympathetic garages ( there are some ) under those circumstances may often make a contribution towards cost in the form of a discount on parts / labour or both . Others would say they did nothing wrong and are entitled to charge the full amount . I have often had similar in the workshop and despite best efforts , you do get bolts / nuts that do snap increasing the oncost to the customer ,
 

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Ok thanks for confirming. I have never encountered this before and didn't know if this was the norm. Still, there are techiniques to help prevent breakage (heat up the manifold or penetrating oils, etc.) that I am unsure were performed. Either way, I can't prove it or not any care was taken. But since the cost goes to the customer on these cases, I wonder how careful they really are.
 

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I can assure you that dealership staff are fully trained and are aware of " there are techiniques to help prevent breakage (heat up the manifold or penetrating oils, etc " It often depends on the location In many cases whether heat can / can not be applied for various reason maybe not apparent to those not qualified in motor engineering .
 
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