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We are looking forward to seeing this movie! It looks like some of it was filmed at the original Shelby location in Venice (Los Angeles) and the Las Vegas Motor Speedway. I hope they got it right, but even if the movie "bombs", it's worth admission just to see the cars. !
 

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We haven’t yet seen the new movie Ford v Ferrari starring Matt Damon and Christian Bale, but we hear it’s really good. We’ve gotten solid reviews from tough critics, including racing historians and participants who were at Le Mans in 1966 for the historic Ford victory. True, the film does take some liberties with historical accuracy for the sake of big screen drama, but that’s simply how the Hollywood movie machine works.

Meanwhile, the true story of the Ford versus Ferrari battle at Le Mans is quite a tale in itself—from the moon-landing engineering effort that produced the Ford GT program, to the management bungling that botched the race finish in the furtherance of corporate glory. One noteworthy interpretation of the event is This Time Tomorrow, a Hollywood-quality documentary commissioned by the Ford Motor Company back in 1966, and we are fortunate to have it for you here. It’s a little long for the internet at 27 minutes, but we think it’s worth the trip.


 

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Just watched Ford v Ferrari , thoroughly enjoyed it . Prior to watching I was thinking at 2 1/2 hrs it may have been too long , but not the case ( pausing it and having a coffee break when my daughter popped in for a flying visit may have helped ) I wont spoil it by revealing the twists and turns . Petrol heads , enjoy !!
 

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I was too but my wife doesn't want to see a car movie. Guess I'll have to wait 'till it comes on PPV.
 

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Surprisingly , with all the wheeling and dealings , personal struggles , big business conflicts , it's really a movie that others that are not car fanatics would also enjoy .
 

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Sorry to spoil it a bit , but we beat you to it .



Put in shade by tiny team of Scots who stunned motorsport

Ecurie Ecosse shook the world of racing in 1956 as the Edinburgh team defeated motoring giants Ferrari, Aston Martin and Jaguar.


It’s a high-octane world of fast cars and fearless drivers racing round the clock at breakneck speed for one of the world’s most prestigious prizes in motor sport.
Le Mans 66 hits cinemas this weekend and tells the story of how two men tried to end Ferrari’s stranglehold on the 24-hour race.
Christian Bale and Matt Damon star as British racing driver Ken Miles and US car designer Carroll Shelby, who work with Ford Motor Company and build a revolutionary racing car to challenge the Italian racing giant.
But even better is the story of Le Mans ’56 – and the Scots who did it all a decade before the Americans.


David Murray with Ecurie Ecosse Types in Merchiston Mews

That was when Ecurie Ecosse, run out of a tiny backstreet garage in the middle of Edinburgh, shook the world of racing, twice defeating the giants of Ferrari, Aston Martin and Jaguar 10 years before the exploits of Shelby and Miles.
Because, while the Ford vs Ferrari movie is billed as an underdog contest, as the US car makers struggled to defeat the Italian stallions, the exploits of the Scots team were founded on the work ethic of an Edinburgh accountant and his pals from a tiny garage in Merchiston Mews.



Ecurie Ecosse driver Ninian Sanderson with team manager David Murray (

Businessman David Murray set up Ecurie Ecosse in 1951, with a foreign-sounding name because there was more chance of lucrative sponsorhips and a team of mechanics and engineers working hard to gain tiny advantages over the big guns.
Within five years, they had made history by winning Le Mans and then repeated it the next year, launching a sporting legacy that has influenced just about every Scots racing superstar, from Sir Jackie Stewart and David Coulthard to Allan McNish and Dario Franchitti, all of whom have raced for the Ecurie name.
Current team boss Alasdair McCaig said it’s a story that everyone in Scotland should be proud of.
He said: “For the past 60 years, Ecurie Ecosse has been a David vs Goliath team. In the 50s, they were run from a backstreet mews garage in Edinburgh with not a lot of budget, almost like a group of friends and businessmen getting together and making best use of what they had available in terms of mechanics and engineers and beating the factory teams.


The Ecurie Ecosse driven by Ivor Bueb and Ron Flockhart head to victory at Le Mans in 1957 (Image: Getty Images)
“It’s always pretty satisfying if you’re the underdog beating the big guys, if you’re in a car with a fraction of the budget and you go and beat everyone.
“Scotland has something to be very proud of in motorsport – look at all the great drivers that have come out of Scotland and Ecurie Ecosse is part of that. They weren’t always the best truck in the paddock with the flashiest equipment but they got the job done and at the end of the day, it’s all about winning races.
“That was the golden era of motorsport.”


Christian Bale as Ken Miles in new film which tells the story of Ford taking on Ferrari
In its early days, Ecurie Ecosse recruited up-and-comers like Jimmy Stewart, who would later bring in his younger brother Jackie. The future Sir Jackie was at Ecurie before heading to Formula 1 with Tyrrell and winning three world championships.
Team boss Murray and his pit crew, led by Wilkie Wilkinson, were working all the time to improve and get closer to the giants of the sport.
By 1956, they were ready to take a chance.
Using an older Jaguar D-Type, they had drivers Ron Flockhart and Ninian Sanderson at the wheel.
And they claimed an impressive win – literally beating reigning champions Jaguar at their own game – and knocking the other big boys like Aston and Ferrari out of the way.
What’s more, Flockhart and driver Ivor Bueb went on to win the title again the following year.
The first win, against a field of better funded and more experienced teams, was amazing .
To retain it was astonishing.


The new Ecurie Ecosse LM69 being built by the team now
Alasdair said: “They were not expecting to win. They were a privateer team going against the huge factories and their aim was just to beat the Jaguar factory cars. But Ecurie Ecosse were very good at engineering the cars, better than the factory, and with a select few people, they went out there and did the job.
“To do it twice in a row was all the better.”
Scots motorsport writer and history expert Graham Gauld remembers the incredible story.
He said: “In 1956, one could say they were cannon fodder against all the big factory teams from Britain and Italy. Thanks to good organisation and planning, they surprised everyone.
“Their secret was just watching the opposition and maintaining a steady fast race for 24 hours while the main factory teams were racing so hard, many of their key drivers dropped out.
“Regarding 1966 and the Le Mans race featured in the movie, Ecurie Ecosse had, by that time, brought on some other Scottish racing drivers who were to become successful, notably Jackie Stewart, who raced with the team in 1963 and 1964 before moving into Formula 1.
“They had also helped Innes Ireland on his way up the racing ladder but the team were no longer racing cars that were eligible for the Le Mans 24-hour race.
“By the end of the 60s, the original Ecurie Ecosse team just could not keep up financially with the way racing was going and then David Murray left Edinburgh for the Canary Islands following financial problems and though the team continued for three years, it finally closed down in 1971.”


Businessman David Murray set up Ecurie Ecosse in 1951

The title of the brand had been held privately by friends of Ecurie Ecosse and in 1984, it was revived by Edinburgh business man Hugh McCaig, Alasdair’s father.
As a child, he had idolised the 50s track heroes and now oversaw a very successful period for the team – his drivers included Allan McNish, David Coulthard and Dario Franchitti, among others.
Hugh’s incarnation saw a return to Le Mans and in 1986, they won the World Sportscar Championship, took part in world group stage championships and then British Touring Cars with Vauxhall and Nissan.
Into the 2000s, the team entered a fallow period but in 2011, his son took over the reins and the titles have returned, along with that trademark ambition.
Alasdair, 37, works as a property developer and runs Ecurie Ecosse as well as racing. He has several trophies in his garage. But he revealed they have big plans for the future.
He said: “Ecurie Ecosse has so much history but we have to look forward as well.
“In the last couple of years, we have won the British GP championship, been runner-up in the Spa 24 Hours, had two podiums, and won the LMP3 championship.
“Aside from all the racing, we also do a lot to support young drivers in terms of mentoring them. Allan McNish is our ambassador.”
The firm is also producing a Scots supercar – the street legal LM69, worth up to £850,000 and capable of speeds of 190mph.
Titled in honour of a Jaguar that was prototyped in 1969 for Le Mans but never developed, the stunning new model, which means Le Mans 69, is the future of the team.
Alasdair said: “There’s nothing like it in the world – and it’ll be quick. Our long-term goal is take Ecurie Ecosse back to Le Mans.”
 

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Now, they too need to get Hollywood behind them.
I hope the world never forgets Jackie Stewart.
Jackie Stewart was a great driver and his family had a garage and filling station about 10 miles away from where I used to live which I often passed at the weekend when on my way to the fishing .Was a champion at clay pigeon shooting and won many awards throughout the UK and Europe . Suffers from dyslexia and spends a lot of time helping out and promoting that . Also done a helluva lot in getting safety in F1 cars , tracks and facilities improved . Still attends most of the F1 races today .Saying that , I still think Jim Clark was a far better driver .
 

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This might interest you Gary .

Sheriff’s Office Adds New 1966 Ford Galaxie Patrol Car To Fleet: Video
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A crowd of 50 people gathered around a brown and perfectly restored 1966 Ford Galaxie police cruiser in Fauquier County, Virginia, recently. The 1966 Ford Galaxie was done up to look just like the very first sheriff’s office police cruiser. The restored car will join the modern fleet of 150 vehicles that the sheriff’s office currently has.
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Sheriff Bob Mosier says that the classic patrol car is a great community relations tool to engage the public, especially kids. The ceremony introducing the restored Galaxie to the fleet was held in the same spot where a 1965 Ford Custom was donated to the sheriff’s office in March of 1965 by the late Mr. and Mrs. Frederik Wachmeister.
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Before that 1965 police car was donated to the sheriff’s office, then sheriff Sam Hall and his deputies used their personal vehicles and were given mileage reimbursements. Mosier ran across an old newspaper clipping of the car shortly after taking office in 2016 about the original donation of the car and decided that they should try and find a car and restore it.
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Several members of the department were part of the search with officer Crane noting they wanted a 1965, but all they found were too far gone or too expensive. Crane says that the 1966 they ended up with isn’t much different than the 1965 the office had in the past. Mosier had arranged for the Fauquier Historical Society to take ownership of the car and accept donations for the restoration of the vehicle.

Bodywork and paint were handled by a local body shop called Classic Automotive. The hardest part to find was the roof light and siren. The pristine siren the car uses cost $1,000 and took six months to find. When all was said and done, the vehicle and its restoration cost about $35,000. The restored vehicle will make its official debut leading the December 6th Warrenton Christmas parade.
 

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Here’s How ‘Ford v Ferrari’ Got The Sound Just Right


Any car person will agree that the sound a car makes as important as how they look and how they perform. In the film, “Ford v Ferrari” the racing cars that were used in the actual 1966 Le Mans race are some of the rarest and most valuable of cars on the planet. That meant that the film couldn’t use the real cars for the racing scenes, they had to use replicas. The cars weren’t just any replicas, though; they were very accurate Superformance replicas, according to reports.
One of the things that James Mangold and the team making “Ford v Ferrari” focused on was getting the sound just right. Sound editor Don Sylvester says that getting the sound just right kept him awake at night during filming. He says that he knew the team had to get the real Ford GT40 because the sound the car makes was central to the film.
ferrari
He says that he feared that if they took the sound of the car from a “bad library,” someone would call and say they had failed, that the sound wasn’t what the car sounded like. The team says that it was able to track down a few original Ford GT40s, but getting the owners to hand their vehicles over to the sound team was nearly impossible.
Sylvester says that the cars are worth somewhere around $10 to $15 million each. He says that no one wanted to give them a car worth that much money to drive around the track with microphones sticking all over it. Ultimately the team was able to find a guy in Ohio who built a GT40 from original Ford parts and had it certified by Ford as a legitimate GT40. The car had the original engine and original pipes.
The team went to Ohio to record the GT40 sound with mics everywhere, including on the transmission housing, and transaxles that gave them the different interior sounds. One trick was finding the right sounds for the right places, but the team made it work. The movie has performed well at the box office.
 
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