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One of my fathers favorite singers.

One of my favourite crooners of all time also . Broke a lot of female hearts when he finally admitted to be gay . Not many people blessed with a voice like his

P.S

" Video from Demon Music not available in my country "

 

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We remember the day Johnny Cash sang Christmas carols in Fife church after almost being killed by his pet ostrich

Singers Johnny Cash and Andy Williams pictured at Falkland Palace.

Singers Johnny Cash and Andy Williams pictured at Falkland Palace.
It was the day the Man in Black swapped San Quentin for St Monans after almost being killed by an ostrich.
Cash lined up in concert with fellow American superstar Andy Williams with bruised and cracked ribs to sing Christmas carols with local schoolchildren at St Monans Parish Church in Fife in October 1981.

Singer Johnny Cash signs an autograph for local, Lillian Jenkins, St Andrews House, Falkland.
The American CBS television network were recording a Johnny Cash Christmas Special in Falkland which was prompted by the discovery that the singer could trace his roots all the way back to King Malcolm IV of Scotland.
In the late 1970s, Cash had decided to research his ancestral history after a chance encounter on a plane with the former laird of Falkland, the late Major Michael Crichton-Stuart.
Cash traced his roots to Strathmiglo and nearby Falkland, where there are farms and streets named after the clan.
The clan Cash originated from Malcolm’s sister, Ada, and the street Cash Feus in Strathmiglo still carries the name Cash, as do Easter Cash, Wester Cash and Cash Mill farms between Falkland and Strathmiglo.
The American Cash connection came about in 1612 when mariner William Cash sailed from Scotland to Salem, Massachusetts, with a boatload of pilgrims.
He later decided to settle in America.

Johnny Cash and Andy Williams pictured at Falkland Palace.
Cash was so interested in his ancestors that he wanted to film the TV special in Fife.
His son John Carter Cash, then aged 11, sang ‘Wee Cooper of Fife’, in another segment of the show which was described as a “Highland fling for the whole family”.
As 85 million fans of the Man in Black later tucked into turkey while watching his 1981 Christmas Special, few realised he had almost cashed in his chips at the hands of his feathered friend.
The remarkable incident is being remembered to mark 65 years since the Man in Black released his first single with Sun Records in June 1955.


The singer kept a collection of exotic animals at his House of Cash office in Hendersonville, Tennessee, and if it hadn’t been for a big stick, he would have died.
He went on to describe how the male ostrich had jumped out and confronted him, crouched with wings spread and hissing nastily.
It had leaped in the air and kicked him in the gut with its huge toe.
“Larger than my size 13 shoe,” the singer explained.

The toe ripped him open and broke several ribs, and Cash reckoned if he hadn’t been wearing a very strong thick belt, his intestines would have been out and he’d have been a goner.
As it was, he kept swinging a big stick at his assailant and it made off.


Cash said: “He made contact – I’m sure there was never any question he wouldn’t – and frankly, I got off lightly.
“All he did was break my two lower ribs and rip my stomach open down to my belt.
“If the belt hadn’t been good and strong, with a solid belt buckle, he’d have spilled my guts exactly the way he meant to.
“As it was, he knocked me over onto my back and I broke three more ribs on a rock – but I had sense enough to keep swinging the stick, so he didn’t get to finish me.
“I scored a good hit on one of his legs, and he ran off.”



Cash insisted on performing in Falkland despite the pain and the shock and went on to play gigs in Edinburgh, Manchester, Sheffield, St Austell, Poole and London.
He was still an international superstar who had sold more albums than any other artist in America during the 1970s and the fans were out in force when he came to Falkland.
Cash recorded Footprints in the Sand at Falkland Palace.
He was also joined by Andy Williams and the duo performed Greensleeves until the early evening.

Williams also sang The Village of St Bernadette at Falkland.
The song choice was the subject of controversy after the minister strongly objected to it being performed in the church.

Singer Johnny Cash pictured with his son, John Carter Cash (11) and one of the locals, Mr John Duncan of Westfield Farm, Falkland, at Falkland Palace.
Filming also took place on the beaches at Kinghorn, Anstruther and Elie before moving to St Monans where Cash was immediately set upon by autograph hunters.
He took nearly 15 minutes to reach St Monans Parish Church as he shook hands and chatted with locals.
Cash sang three Christmas carols with pupils from St Monans Primary School at the church.
Fans of the singer packed the church for the recording.
He returned to Falkland a year later with his wife June Carter Cash where a story about the time he stopped on the Falkland Hill road to help a young lad change the wheel on his car has gone down in folklore.
Cash visited Fife several times to try and plug gaps in his family tree before he died in Nashville in 2003 aged 71.
He had only survived his wife June by four months.
His fans were convinced he died of a broken heart.




Cash’s daughter Rosanne, who is also an American country and western singer, embarked upon a spiritual quest to Fife following the death of her father to learn more about her family’s centuries-old link with the Howe of Fife.

Johnny Cash (singer) visited the land of his ancestors.
She managed to trace many of the Cash place names which still resonate on farms and streets in the area, and she shed tears of emotion when she visited Bob Beveridge’s Violin Shop on the main square.
Mr Beveridge recalled later how Cash parked himself on a bench outside the palace to happily chat away to the villagers during filming in 1981.

Singer Johnny Cash signs some autographs.
“He was a lovely, thoroughly nice man,” he said.
“Big and quietly spoken, and fair proud of his links here in Falkland.
“When he was here making his TV special, he used to sit up at the palace and talk to all the locals, asking them about what they did.
“There was none of this: “I’m a star, I’m Johnny Cash”.
“There was no big ego.”
The Man in Black
Born in Kingsland, Arkansas, on February 26 1932, JR Cash had English and Scottish roots.
His parents were Ray Cash and Carrie Cloveree, and he was the fourth of their seven children.
It was only when he tried to enlist in the US Air Force he was told he couldn’t simply use JR Cash as his name, so he changed it to John R Cash.
He would never forget his beloved big brother Jack.
In 1944, he got dragged into a table saw and suffered terribly for a week before dying, aged just 15.
A man of deep faith, Cash would speak the rest of his life about how he looked forward to being with Jack again when he, too, went to Heaven.
Church played a big part in his childhood and youth, and he loved gospel music.
His mother taught him some chords on guitar and, though his voice was amazingly high as a kid, he would later develop the much deeper sound the world came to love.
He was only months into his 18th year when he enlisted with the US Air Force, where he worked as a Morse code operator, intercepting Soviet transmissions.
It was also at this time that he got the distinctive scar on his jaw after getting surgery to remove a cyst.

In the summer of 1951, aged just 19, he fell for 17-year-old Vivian Liberto, before they got married in 1954 and had four daughters, including Rosanne, who would become rather famous herself in the music world.
The marriage would last just a dozen years, with his first wife blaming his alcohol and drug abuse for driving them apart.
He and Vivian had moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where he became an appliance salesman while learning to be a radio announcer.
In the evenings, he would play with other musicians and eventually he dropped in on the famous Sun Records studio and suggested he might be worth a recording deal.
Sam Phillips, who would also play a pivotal role in the careers of Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis and others, liked songs such as Hey Porter, and Cash was on his way.

In 1955, signing for Sun Records, he began to use the name Johnny Cash all the time.
His signature song, Folsom Prison Blues, was also written and recorded back in the Sun days, making the top five in the country charts.
Cash did spend the occasional night behind bars, but those short stays were for lesser demeanours.
I Walk The Line was released in 1956 made top spot in the country charts and also number 17 on the US pop charts.
Cash signed for Columbia Records in 1958.
His single Don’t Take Your Guns to Town became one of his biggest hits, and he recorded a collection of gospel songs for his second album for Columbia.
Cash began performing concerts at prisons in the late 1950s.
These performances led to a pair of highly successful live albums, Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison (1968) and Johnny Cash at San Quentin (1969).

Cash was approached by ABC to host a television show in 1969 which ran for two series featuring the country legend and an incredible line-up of special guests.
CBS revived the show in 1976 under the name Johnny Cash and Friends which was recorded at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, with specials airing almost every year until 1985.
Cash suffered a career slump in the 1980s and early 1990s playing small, shabby venues like Butlins Southcoast World in Bognor Regis.
American Record’s founder, Rick Rubin, producer of landmark rap and heavy metal acts like LL Cool J and Slayer, rescued him from oblivion.
Cash won a Grammy for his landmark American Recordings record and a fistful more for his five other American Recordings albums.
Cash won 11 Grammys in all, including a lifetime achievement award in 1999.
 

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I get a bike before she gets a baby grand from me. I have my priorities.
 

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I get a bike before she gets a baby grand from me. I have my priorities.
My son, Jake, is saving for a new Thruxton R. He just about has the cash (I taught him how expensive credit is) He also found a Bell helmet with IOM logos. Arizona is soon to have a bit of Britan roaming the streets, but I hope Dad gets to "test" his bike when he visits California.
 

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My son, Jake, is saving for a new Thruxton R. He just about has the cash (I taught him how expensive credit is) He also found a Bell helmet with IOM logos. Arizona is soon to have a bit of Britan roaming the streets, but I hope Dad gets to "test" his bike when he visits California.

Way to go!
 

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Years ago, someone told me I had to take his bike for a spin. I had to lay it down to avoid a dog and I managed to do it in the dirt (as you all know, asphalt hurts and is unforgiving) and sustained minimal damage to myself and the bike.The dog left unscathed and laughing. Anyway, when I handed the bike back I got a lot of shit for it and since then, I've made a hard and fast rule: "Never ride another man's bike or or another man's woman".

Baja, that makes your story a little creepy.

The woman part is a different story and not the same guy.
 

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A top pipe band has come together over video conferencing to create a haunting rendition of one of Art and Garfunkel's most famous songs after being forced to practice together from home during lockdown.

The Keith Highlanders Pipe Band from Seattle posted the stunning rendition of the "Sound of Silence" on YouTube after being been unable to practice or perform together for over four months.

The incredible Brady-Bunch style clip features members playing instruments including the pipes, a piano and drums beside some of the city's best-known landmarks.


Music director Lawrence Koch explained that the band, which currently has around 45 members, usually play 20-30 performances each year, aiming to broadening the public’s interest in and appreciation for traditional Scottish piping, drumming, and dancing in the Pacific Northwest.

He added that they originally had the idea of doing the videos after they realised they would be able to perform their newest song, “Dollar Sunrise”, which was written by Australian piper Lincoln Hilton.

He said: "When coronavirus started, we were locked down here in Washington State in early March. We had been planning to debut the new performance piece for a local show in late March which was cancelled.


"So I thought that doing a video with all the players 'Brady Bunch'-style, might be good to try give the group a goal and to motivate everyone to keep practicing."


After each member filmed their parts, one of the group, Tim Hutchinson put together a video which had a huge response on social media.

"Tim released it on Facebook and YouTube at the end of April. We had a fantastic response. It was the most popular video or post that the band had ever done."

Lawrence explained that once the Dollar Sunrise video took off, Tim then suggested that the band play a piece he had arranged, adding that it was "ironically" a song with silence in the name, he said: "Some members of the band are multi-instrumentalists, so we were able to include their talents on piano and drum kit as well. In total, we had 30 players on this video."

Garfunkel once summed up the song's meaning as "the inability of people to communicate with each other", apt then that the pipe band should use it to bring them closer together again during the lockdown following the outbreak of the coronavirus.

Keith added that it's a new frontier for the band, which was originally founded in the in 1952 and is the official band of the Clan Keith (a rare designation for a band outside Scotland), he sad: "This video has been a huge success. It has been out for almost a week, and has had 305,000 views and Facebook says we have reached 728,000 people.

"Quite a feat for a video by a pipe band. I think it has been so successful because it is a popular and recognizable tune for so many people so the audience is greater than traditional pipe music, it is new/different (I think we are the first pipe band to try to record it), and the arrangement with harmonies and other instruments is great and fun to listen to."

Featuring two competition bands, Keith confirmed their Grade 3B band was actually planning a trip to the World Pipe Band Championships in Glasgow this August (which has been cancelled), and is looking to reschedule the trip for next year instead.




 

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Very impressive. I actually like hearing the pipes, but I did once hear a complaint/joke that I still find amusing.

What's the difference between running over a cat and someone playing the bagpipes?
They both make the same noise, but you know that the cat will stop pretty soon.
 

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Frank Sinatra said this of Matt Monro: “If I had to choose three of the finest male vocalists in the singing business, Matt would be one of them. His pitch was right on the nose; his word enunciations letter perfect; his understanding of a song thorough.” ... It's Matt Monro and any other two according to taste.

Legends Matt Monro Man With The Golden Voice

 

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Charley Pride, Pioneering Black Country Singer, Dead at 86

Country Music Hall of Fame member died in Texas from complications related to Covid-19


Charley Pride performs on a TV show, London, February 1975. (Photo by Michael Putland/Getty Images)

Charley Pride performs on a TV show, London, February 1975.
Michael Putland/Getty Images
Charley Pride, the pioneering black country singer known for such hits as “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'” and “Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone,” has died in Dallas, Texas, from complications related to Covid-19, according to his publicist. He was 86.
Born in Sledge, Mississippi, in 1934, Pride picked cotton, played baseball in the ***** leagues, served in the U.S. Army, and worked in a smelting plant in Montana before moving to Nashville and becoming country music’s first black superstar. He scored 52 Top 10 country hits, including 29 Number Ones, and was the first African-American performer to appear on the Grand Ole Opry stage since Deford Bailey made his debut in the 1920s. Pride became an Opry member in 1993. In 2000, he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

After leaving the Army, Pride landed in Helena, Montana, where he continued to play baseball (Jackie Robinson was an early hero) and took a job in a smelting plant. He also began singing in public, where he caught the ear of a local DJ who arranged for Pride to sing for country stars Red Sovine and Red Foley. The pair convinced him to move to Nashville and, in 1964, he signed a management deal with longtime manager Jack D. Johnson. The following year, he had his first Nashville recording session and, a month later, signed with the label RCA.
Pride’s debut single, “The Snakes Crawl at Night,” failed to chart, but his debut album, Country, reached the Top 20. His 1967 album The Pride of Country Music went on to hit Number One and, that same year, he became the first African-American solo singer to appear on the Opry. On April 29th, he made his national TV debut, appearing on Lawrence Welk’s Saturday-night ABC music series.

A lifelong disciple of Hank Williams, Pride’s debut on The Lawrence Welk Show presented his vibrant take on Williams’ 1949 hit “Lovesick Blues.” During a later appearance, Pride sang Lead Belly’s oft-covered folk tune “Cotton Fields,” a song that reminded him of his hard upbringing as a sharecropper’s son. “[It] reminds me of what I don’t ever go back to doing because it hurt my fingers and my back and my knees,” Pride said.
Pride’s appearance on a variety show popular with a white audience was no small achievement, especially given RCA’s early penchant for obscuring Pride’s race. When Pride’s singles were sent to DJs and press, they arrived without the usual artist publicity photo.
By 1969, Pride was on a hot streak, propelled by his Top Three cover of Hank Williams’ “Kaw-Liga.” He notched his first Number One single with “All I Have to Offer You (Is Me),” following by another chart-topper, “(I’m So) Afraid of Losing You Again.” The following year Pride released one of his signatures songs, “Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone.” It too hit Number One. His other signature, “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin’,” arrived in 1971 and gave him a bona fide crossover smash, reaching Number 21 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The hits continued well into the early Eighties, with singles like 1974’s “Then Who Am I,” 1977’s “More to Me,” 1980’s “Honky Tonk Blues” and “You Win Again” (two more Hank Williams covers), and 1983’s sultry “Night Games,” which would be his last Number One.
Despite being such an important black figure in country music, Pride never felt defined by his race, even when peppered with questions about it by the press. “I never see anything but the staunch American Charley Pride,” he told NPR in a 2017 interview. “They says, ‘Charley, how did it feel to be the Jackie Robinson of country music? How did it feel to be the first colored country singer? How did it feel to be the first ***** country singer? How did it feel to be the first black country singer?’ It don’t bother me, other than I have to explain it to you how I maneuvered around all these obstacles to get to where I am today…. I’ve got a great-grandson and [grand] daughter and they gonna be asking them that too if we don’t get out of this crutch we’ve been in all these years… this ‘them’ and ‘us.'”

In a 2019 documentary about his life and career, Pride did recall one particularly tense concert, however. It was in Big Springs, Texas, on April 4, 1968 — the date of Martin Luther King’s assassination. “I got onstage, nobody said nothin’,” Pride said. “They applauded, I got a standing ovation. I didn’t say nothin’ about nothin’ pertaining to what had happened. But it was hanging there, what had happened and me the only one there with these pigmentations. You don’t forget nothin’ like that.”
Dolly Parton, who sang with Pride on the duet “God’s Coloring Book,” remembered the country star in a tweet on Saturday. “I’m so heartbroken that one of my dearest and oldest friends, Charley Pride, has passed away,” she wrote. “It’s even worse to know that he passed away from COVID-19. What a horrible, horrible virus. Charley, we will always love you.”

Just last month, Pride, a three-time Grammy winner, was honored by the Country Music Association with the Willie Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award. He performed on the telecast with country singer Jimmie Allen, recreating “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin’.” It would be Pride’s final performance.
 

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We love country music in our house and we love Charley Pride's songs. I have good memories of my kids, who were just toddlers, singing "Kiss an Angel Good Morning" as they played around the house. Another legend is gone and he will be greatly missed.
 

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Eddie Van Halen to be honoured with new range of guitars

The nine new guitars are from EVH, the company the rock icon helped found and name
ByJosh Martin
12th January 2021

Van Halen
Eddie Van Halen. CREDIT: Daniel Knighton/Getty Images
The late Eddie Van Halen will have a new range of nine guitars made in his honour by the company he helped found and name, EVH.
The reimagined 5150 series, set to be released in early 2021, comprises guitars that have been designed for speed and comfort, supporting Van Halen’s signature “tapping” technique. They’ll arrive in a bright set of colours, including neon pink, and at a range of prices.
In a statement announcing the new guitars, EVH spoke of Van Halen’s influence: “The industry saw record guitar-playing interest in 2020 but also sadly said goodbye to one of the most innovative and influential players of its time.
“Eddie Van Halen’s singularly inventive style inspired an entire generation of players. He innovated not only in how he played but what he played and what he played through by creating some of the greatest guitars and amps the world has seen and heard.”
The nine guitars have Stratocaster-style basswood bodies with a deeper upper body curve, featuring specifications made by Van Halen himself: bolt-on quarter-sawn carved maple necks, and a 12- to 16-inch compound radius fingerboard with 22 jumbo frets. All are powered by direct-mount EVH Wolfgang bridge and neck humbucking pickups.
The new 5150 range of 2021 EVH guitars
The new 5150 range of EVH guitars, made in the rock icon’s honour. Photo credit: EVH / Eddie Van Halen via @evhgear on Twitter.
Two Wolfgang Special guitar models and four Wolf WG Standard variants will also be released as part of the 2021 EVH range. The former pair of guitars are similar to the 5150 range, excepting a direct-mount EVH Wolfgang Alnico 2 bridge and neck humbucking pickups. The WG Standard variants are entry-level models, and will feature a baked maple neck and fingerboard with standard EVH Wolfgang humbuckers.




Van Halen died on October 6, 2020, at the age of 65, following a long battle with cancer. Last month, the rock icon’s death certificate was obtained by TMZ, citing his immediate cause of death as a cerebrovascular accident, or a stroke. He also had several underlying causes, including pneumonia, the bone marrow disorder myelodysplastic syndrome and lung cancer.
 
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