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No; it's a locating dowel so the head can be positioned on the block correctly. While they often have two locating dowels you only need one for correct head to block and head gasket assembly and equally as often they only come with one installed. They do often suffer corrosion damage with head gasket failures etc and are cheap and readily availablee if you need another e.g. GENUINE FORD CYLINDER HEAD DOWEL 4.0 DOHC PETROL EFI 24V VCT SEE DESCRIPTION | eBay As you can also see from the ebay listing assembly diagram only one is needed.
 

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That's correct for new ford OEM head bolts only. However, always use new torque-to-yield (TTY) head bolts and tighten them according to the instructions that come with them; different aftermarket maker's bolts have different elasticity and therefore different torque requirements. The factory bolts, like nearly all TTY bolts, are a one use only as they are torque-to-yield (see Torque-to-yield (T‑t-y) Bolt Specification & Installation and https://www.onallcylinders.com/2016...orque-yield-fasteners-torque-angle-fastening/ etc ) and once used are stretched cannot be reused. I usually use Nason head bolts (e.g.ORD 3.9 4.0 LITRE CYLINDER HEAD BOLTS EA EB ED EF EL AU FALCON NASON NHBS041-S | eBay ) but there are lots of alternative brands and Permaseal is also a good choice.

So a hell of a lot of what exactly was in the sump?
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
Yes I'm using Nason bolts.
The sump had bits of timing chain guide, bits of rubber, gasket, bits of metal shavings. I know some of it was my newbie status, I have no answer for the rest of the gunk that was in there. Its clean now, after days of effort.
Thanks for your help, Ill get back to it.
 

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can that be done properly with the motor still in?
No. But if there was a lot of crap in the sump the risk is it:

a) will also have blocked the oil pickup mesh screen;
b) this will have opened the bypass valve on the pickup so the pump can still get oil; and
c) an open bypass valve will allow debris into the oil pump that will then seize stripping the distributor drive and causing other damage.

So and least use your borescope to check the screen is not blocked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #110 ·
Ive put in new timing chain, new guides new tentioner. Changed the rockers for a second hand set. i still have that annoying noise. Plenty of oil getting to the top of the motor. Hopefully you can hear it clearly. Let me know if i need to do a better video.
The timing chain appears to be firm and running smooth. I just cant work out the noise. Its driving me mad.
apparently my link is named the date

18 November 2021

.
 

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What brand and specification oil are you using? Using a heavier grade oil than is specified will give you noisy lifters. They are very fussy about what oil they have. Also check that the timing chain tensioner spring is not jammed in it's bore. Were both the chain guides replaced?
 

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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
The head was done through a head specialist, so the valves should be fine. All the guides are new. The tensioner spring was new. Here are 5 (5 second videos) with a stethoscope
No. 1 is gearbox/flex plate
No 2 is block around no. 5 piston
No. 3 is sitting on rocker arms
No, 4 is the timing chain cover
No. 5 just the overall motor.
I'm thinking maybe the gearbox or number 5 or 6 piston rod

1 One

2 Two

3 Three

4 Four

5
 

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It does sound like a bad big end knock. Remove one spark plug lead at a time and run the engine; if the knocking noise goes or reduces significantly you have confirmed that's the cause and will know which cylinder has the issue.
 

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The oil is Castrol 10/30
But which variety of 10W -30; Magnatec, GTX, Power1 etc noting that many AU owners have reported getting rid of minor engine knocking by moving to 5W-30 and it's what Castrol now recommends per Castrol Oil Guide and Oil Selector | Castrol Australia | CASTROL AUSTRALIA albeit that Ford did originally specify 10w -30 that meet spec WSS-M2C-910-A2 for Series II and II AUs and 5W-30 ILSAC GF2 for the Series 1 AU. But both those oil specifications are now obsolete and I think the only oil that Castrol made to spec WSS-M2C-910-A2 was GTX Professional the bulk oil sold to dealers etc.. Out of curiosity what does your owner's manual specify?
 

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No intention of interfering with the great help you are being giving from Aussiblue and not having read all the posts ( just look in now and again ) but could it be a fault with the crankshaft pulley .?

Exit stage left :)
 

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No intention of interfering with the great help you are being giving from Aussiblue and not having read all the posts ( just look in now and again ) but could it be a fault with the crankshaft pulley .?

Exit stage left :)
This has been discussed before and on page 5 of this thread the OP in part said:
I replaced the timing chain tentioner plus harmonic balancer and all the pullys plus the exhaust
It is a lot better.
so you would think not.
 

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Recapping (perhaps somewhat brutally), I understand the issues with this engine started when the timing chain and chain guides broke. At that point the most correct and appropriate response would have been to pull the engine from the vehicle to determine what caused this and to strip it down and thoroughly clean it to remove all large and fine debris including those in the oil passages, oil pump, pump pickup (and pick up screen) sump, valve lifters, valve gear and bearings. At the same time all engine parts would have been inspected and repaired and replaced as required and the engine completely overhauled (valves re-seated, new gaskets fitted head and block machined etc). Most likely after inspection and cleaning, new lifters and all new rings and bearings would also have been fitted and some new pistons and connecting rods fitted as needed where damaged and the cylinders at least honed if not re-bored. Alternatively, a known good second hand or rebuilt engine with a warranty could have been fitted. The foregoing pull the engine and thorough inspection clean and overhaul procedure is what I have always done when faced with similar circumstances.

In any event, we now have a worn engine with some new expensive parts fitted but with almost certainty some broken guide and chain parts debris of various sizes and hardness still in the sump, circulating in the oil and oil passages and likely held to the sumps pick-up screen. Further it’s extremely likely that we also have damaged and worn parts from the broken guide pieces circulating in the oil and from time to time blocking the sump pick-up screen and allowing other debris to circulate into the pump and through the oil passages and into the valve gear and bearings etc. This has probably already damaged the bearing causing the knocking.

Ultimately, I believe that unless the engine is pulled and all parts thoroughly cleaned and inspected and more new components fitted as required this engine is extremely likely going to fail catastrophically; be it from a) a seized bearing (and/or an associated bent rod) b) another broken timing chain and/or chain guide when another old piece of debris gets caught in the chain, c) a locked up oil pump when a piece of debris gets inside d)valve gear failure from a piece of debris being caught in it or e) a similar debris caused failure.

I will keep trying to help with further "band-aid" solutions and interim diagnostics as requested but I am not sure it is really the best way to go. But it's your call and I will continue to answer questions and help as i can. There is of course a chance (I think extremely small one) I am wrong about this and you will find a long term cheap fix without pulling, and thoroughly inspecting, cleaning and overhauling the engine. Or you might elect to live with the noise and other issues and simply replace or overhaul the engine when it ultimately fails. Again, and regardless of what you choose to do, I will continue to provide any advice I can when asked.
 
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