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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, new to the forum and looking for a little help. (DESPERATE)

I have come across an issue that seems to go in cycles with this vehicle.
It’s regarding the vehicle not wanting to crank no rapid fire clicking no start.
Here is what I have checked and the results and or my conclusions about the results.

Turning the key to on does not produce a rapid clicking of the starter.
Tested starter as good twice.
Changed starter out twice(even though it did not need it.)
Tested battery as good. (battery date 8/19)
Alternator tested out as good.
Starter relay tested out good (swapped it out with the fan blower relay which is the same one.)
Ignition switch cartridge fuse looks good, does not look blown.
Ignition switch, under steering column, was replaced and vehicle did not start.
Cable jump starting the vehicle will not start it.

If I finagle with it long enough like taking the battery out and get it fully charged at the local auto shop; or whatever else I did in between then the vehicle eventually starts and runs; but only for about two weeks and then it goes right back to no crank no rapid fire clicking no start and the cycle over again.

Any help is much appreciated.
 

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What voltage are you getting on battery after lying overnight or when it fails ?
 

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So with jumper cables there is still no crank or click?. Some possibilities are starter solenoid or transmission inhibitor switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So with jumper cables there is still no crank or click?. Some possibilities are starter solenoid or transmission inhibitor switch.
That is correct. This issue seems to go in cycles and this would be the fourth time the truck does this. The last time I was experiencing this a buddy suggested to jump started it with his truck(Toyota 4Runner V6). When we tried I did get a rapid fire cranking to the starter but it did not start. Next day took battery and had it tested, came in at about 74/75 % of charge; had it fully charged placed it back in the vehicle and it started. Two weeks later, this would be yesterday, the cycle started again. I tried jump starting with my Volvo S60 and no rapid fire this time at all. Took off battery had it tested again and it came in at 74% charge / 12.43 volts. It is currently at the store getting charged. Waiting to pick it up and placing it back to see what happens.
 

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My two cents: You have described a situation whereby everything should work, but you are experiencing "intermittency." Under such conditions, the first thing I suspect is a bad ground. I usually take a jumper cable and clamp it up to the negative terminal of the battery. Then I take a long screwdriver and put it in the other clamp of said cable. Then I use the screwdriver and touch it to the casing/base of the starter (do not touch any of the contacts of the starter or any other metal of the vehicle with this screwdriver!) What you are essentially doing is running a grounding wire from the starter casing/base directly to the battery(neg). Then have a helper try starting up the car. If the car starts up, suspect a bad ground. To help understand this, please read the example below:

My kid's 2006 Ford Escape would not start (no crank; no solenoid engaging; essentially a no-noise situation). We tried jumping it, but still no starter nor solenoid. At this point, we suspected the starter/solenoid assembly might be bad. So we went online to see what a new one would cost. Then I said to my son, "This car is getting up there in years to the point whereby grounding problems can start showing up." So I told my son to get in the car, then I hooked up a jumper cable to the negative battery post, then I managed to stick my long screwdriver (clamped to the other end of said jumper cable) thru a small space to the base of the starter motor. (Note: The starter motor was mounted on top of the transmission so you could only get at the starter from the top. Some starters are mounted way low, and you can only get to them by jacking up the car and crawling underneath.) Once grounded, the car started right up. Now, in this case, I suspect that the problem was a grounding strap attached between the transmission (upon which the starter was bolted to) and the body. I didn't want to fool around (and getting at the grounding strap looked like a pain in the ass, etc.), and the starter was easy to get to from the top, so I ran a $10 battery cable (with eye-loops at each end) from one of the starter mounting bolts directly to the battery.

Neither here no there, but another incident that just came to mind: The windshield wiper motor wouldn't work on my old truck. I took a wire with an alligator clip at each end, and I clipped one end to the motor, and the other end to a nearby bolt. It worked. In that case too, I then got a longer wire with alligator clips and I wound the wire around from the motor directly to the battery. This way, anything in the area that did not have a good ground, now had a good ground.

Just something else to try.
 
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