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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know of a replacement fuel pump that doesn't start whining after couple months? This is the second one pump and same prob.
 

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Bronco Member
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7 Posts
I'd recommend getting a Motorcraft pump. I just replaced mine with one and it hasn't given me any problems. For some things you don't want to risk using a sub-quality part on, fuel pumps are one of those.
 

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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
Replacement Fuel Pumps

I have recently replace a suspected bad fuel pump in my Bronco unit (5.0 Ltr. FI). The original pump was not entirely bad , but I replaced it anyway. I do not know what fuel system that you have; since it was not in your note. However if you have the original MPFI setup you have a tank mounted pump, and inline fuel filter (or switcher for dual tanks), and a rail mounted hi-pressure pump to raise the pressure to 40 Lbs.
Is this the pump that you think makes the noise. If you have not checked the output of the tank pump, and replaced the inline filter it may be straining to draw enough fuel through the system to feed the injectors. The tank pump should supply at least 5 to 7 Lbs. of pressure to the filter, and the filter unit should be replaced if any less than 5 Lbs. is fed to the input of the High Pressure Pump.
I would check that the tank pump is at least operational. I would then replace that "stinking" fuel filter since it does not cost much.
Then I would remove the new High Pressure Fuel Pump, and check the "stuffing foam" that mounts that holds that HP pump in its mount. Mostly if there is a good system the noise from the pump is the result of that foam becoming stiff because of age or heat. If possible replace the pump's mount hardware.
JBP;)
 

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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hmm... problems related?

I just realized something about my noisey fuel pump and a problem with the idling when i first start the truck. I'll start my truck and hear the familiar whine i believe is the fuel pump. it'll idle at about 2000rpm for less then a sec and then drop below 1000rpm to the point the engine will stall, which has happened a few times. Anyone think this could be related to a fuel pump prob?
 

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Bronco Member
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7 Posts
So it will run ok at 2k RPM, but it won't idle without stalling at under 1k? If it'll hold at 2k I wouldn't think it is fuel pump related. Check your EGR valve and make sure it isn't stuck open and that the idle air valve is working.

Also, pull the codes from the EEC and see what it is reporting. It can actually be dead-on as to what the problem is.

Glenn
 

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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
well the initial start up of my truck is kinda like this.
turn the key.. engine starts going
1) about half a sec - 2000rpm
2) down to 1000rpm for about a few secs
3) up to 2000rpm for a few secs
4) if i'm lucky it'll stay around the 1000rpm area, thats when everythings calmed down.

the scenario in my other posting was when at step 2 the engine would drop below 1000 rpm and almost stall, but if it doesn't stall it'll finish out the steps. If i tap on the gas after step 1 i skip to step 4, with no probs. Some part of the fuel system is either dirty or not working right.
 

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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
I would check for these items: If you have a 5.0 Ltr, F.I engine it is equipped with a "IAC" Idle Air Controller on top of the breather.
It is the job of this unit to control the idle speed of the engine. This unit at time sticks either open or close this affects the engine speed one way or the other. The IAC is controlled by the system computer and may be affected by other sensors in the system.
It would be better to have this item reviewed by a "reputable" dealer, even if you decide to fix it yourself. The ECM system is too complicated with respect to diagnosis for someone on the internet to do this remotely. I do not know the status of your system with respect to how good your sensors are, but a Ford tech would be helpful. You see sometimes mechanics compensate for a bad IAC by 'over-cranking" the idle screw to raise the idle speed, but this de-calibrates the system and all idle speed's are off.
This is not a function of a poor fuel pump system. The high pressure fuel pump (mounted on the frame underneath engine) main function is to raise fuel pressure to at least 40Lb. of pressure to be sent to the injectors. It either works or doesn't work. I would check the fuel filter most people fail to replace it.
If it is gummed up it will force the pumps to over work and sometimes "whine".
 

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Bronco Member
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7 Posts
First off, what year is the vehicle and what engine? Have you pulled the codes?

It's common for the engine to rev up to 2000 RPM and stay there for a little then calm down to idle after starting. If you press on the gas pedal and raise the RPMs yourself it should then end the high idle process and go to a normal idle. That part is all normal. There are a few things that can cause a screwy idle. First is the IAC (Idle Air Contol) as mentioned by Juan. The second is the EGR valve not fully closing, the third is a dirty throttle body.

You can force the EGR to close by pressing down on the diapragm by inserting a screwdriver through one of the holes and pressing down, or remove the sensor on top and pushing down. Disconnect the vacuum line and plug it and try idling the engine. I

As for the throttle body:

I don't know how old the vehicle is and how many miles are on it, but a dirty throttle body is a pretty common thing. What happens is carbon builds up in the throttle body and prevents the plates from fuly closing. Cleaning it is pretty simple. What you will need is: A new throttle body gasket, a can of throttle body cleaner (DO NOT USE CARB CLEANER!), and an old toothbrush. Removing the throttle body is very simple. Disconnect the throttle linkage from the top, and if an auto tranny the kickdown cable. Remove the two hoses coming in from the air filter top. Disconnect wiring to the IAC and TPS (Throttle position sensor). Disconnect the two vacuum lines on the side of the throttle body behind the IAC going to the charcoal filter. Disconnect the two coolant lines. Remove the four bolts holding the throttle body on to the upper intake manifold. If the coolant hose doesn't want to co-operate I usually just cut them and replace them. The throttle linkage removes by pulling it straight up, the kickdown cable for the auto tranny is removed by pulling it forward then up.

After you remove the throttle body you can remove the IAC from the side of the throttle body and the TPS from the bottom of it. Lay some newspapers down and proceede to hose down the throttle body. Use the brush to get into the nooks and crannies and get all carbon out. You can remove the throttle plates with a phillips screwdriver. Just make sure you put them back in the same orientation they came out. The whole removal, cleaning and reinstallation process takes less than an hour.

When you put the TPS back on, make sure you have installed it correctly as it designed to work in one direction only. Don't forget to reconnect the two vacuum lines!

Glenn
 

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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
Dear "Bored Ford"
Almost without exception never use spray carb cleaner near a sensor unit. There are sensors located at the bottom the throttle body plates that will seize because the chemicals in the cleaner melt the plastic in the sensor. Most carb cleaners are too strong for the plastic parts. I had removed my complete air horn assembly on my 5.0 ltr and completely cleaned it out using detergent. Laundry detergent at that.
Never clean out any sensor or actuator with carb cleaner; particularly the IAC unit, throtle position sensor, map or maf sender units either.
 

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Bronco Member
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40 Posts
I'am sorry Bro', but that's the word.
Do you intend to rebuild your emmission system sensors on your 5.0?.
It may still be possible that the spray is not the sole cause of the vehicle not starting. I would not guarantee that it is the cause, but it seems that it is reasonable .
Do you have spark? some times the distributor mounted module has a bad connection or the module itself may have failed.
The 5.0 will usually start up under most conditions even if it runs badly. I would check out the spark circuit. I replaced my module, and coil within a month of buying my Bronco.;)
 

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F-250 Member
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42 Posts
hey thanks for the help but i found what it was. First i checked the batterie and it sucked badly so i replaced it but i first replaced the alternator. then i checked spark and i had it so i then i checked the fuel pressure and i had that so i checked the injectors and they were good but the wires werent sending and votage so we routed it to the eec power realeyso i bought that from ford for $13 and now my truck runs awesome
 
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