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I have a 2000 Ford Taurus ses. I had all 4 brakes just replaced two weeks ago, rotors turned, new pads; etc. Now there is a terrible knocking sound that happens when I apply the brakes, and only when I apply the brakes. I took it back to the mechanic that did them and he said that I have a bent rim and a steel belt has broken in one of the tires. Ok, fine, but wouldn't that make a knocking noise all the time? The car drives just fine, until I apply the brakes, Then the banging/knocking noise starts and it doesn't stop until I come to a complete stop. What can it be?
 

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It is definetely not a shifted belt. I have had this same problem on my 2001 Taurus SEL and my mother's 1999 Sable LS. I have also run into this on a few newer Dodges where the caliper slides are in the caliper brackets, rather than on the caliper itself. What happens is that dirt and brake dust eventually work their way past the dust boots of the slides on the caliper brackets. When your slowing down the slides actually vibrate or flex back and forth slightly causing friction between the slides and the dirt. What has to be done is the calipers have to be unbolted and removed. The caliper slides then can be pulled out. Clean the old grease and dirt off the slides. The dirt doesn't really accumulate in the holes on the caliper bracket, just on the pins. Next, using BRAKE GREASE, NOT WHEEL BEARING GREASE, NOT WHITE LITHIUM GREASE, pump the grease into the holes on the brackets until it over flows out of the hole. Apply a small amount on the slides. Re-insert the slides into the brackets. You wil feel some resistance because you are slightly compressing the grease in a blind hole. Push the pin in and let it come out slightly a few times until you can push the slide in enough to have the slide's boot slip on to the end of the caliper bracket holes. If the pin starts coming out, as long as it doesn't pop out completely you are done. Finnally, re-install the calipers. The brake grease usually comes in tubes, is usually synthetic, is similar to di-electric grease which is clear in color. If you can't find it at a parts store or you dealer, try cgoing to a Chrysler, Dodge, or Jeep dealer and request a tube of Mopar Brake grease-Part number J8993704. It used to be brown in color, but has just been changed to the clear color. This is just on the front brakes. Good Luck!!!
 
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