Ford Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 2011 Crown Vic with 300k miles 12 mos ago and I'm wondering how to approach servicing the timing belt. I know very little of it's past maintenance records other than what I've done with it this past year. Basically I'm wondering if I should go ahead and attempt to replace it now, or wait til something starts to go wrong. I don't know how timing belts typically go bad...if they just break or start to stretch or what. If this is an interference engine I'm imagining a fairly bad event so I'd like to get educated and be pro active about it.

Second...Scotty Kilmer teaches that the worst wear an engine sees after changing the oil is before the oil gets pumped back into the filter and then into the engine components during the first engine restart. But he says if you disable the ignition spark somehow when cranking for the first time again, the lack of combustion in the cylinders helps with reducing this kind of wear quite a bit. I don't have an owner's manual and I'm not sure what fuse to pull to disable combustion ignition, or if removing a fuse would be the best way to do this. Any opinions on how this should be done?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,319 Posts
As far as I'm aware , unless they have changed it you dont have a timing belt , it's a chain . As for Scotty Kilmer , technically he is correct but usually there will be enough residual oil on the bearings/trapped in the system .On a lot of cars you can “prime” the oil filter by filling it before fitting , unless it is fitted vertically or horizontally like on Ferraris for example . On the thousands of oil changes I have done , never disabled the engine from firing . Might be warranted on a new engine rebuild or different circumstances .
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
As Logan said, the 4.6 has timing chains (two), not belts. They are not difficult to change, but normally last the life of the engine. However, chain tension is maintained by oil pressure and serious problems can occur if the oil has not been changed regularly. Chain tension problems will usually be quite evident with excessive noise around the timing cover and/or aluminum particles in the oil. Cut your old filter apart to check for excessive wear.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top