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Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
I think they perfected
some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
another look at
this idea?
-Rich
 
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Discussion Starter #2
[email protected] wrote:
> Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
> I think they perfected
> some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
> another look at
> this idea?


There are plenty of options. Nuclear power is one of them. Heck, for a
$100 billion investment, you could harvest solar energy on the moon and
beam it back as microwaves...ensuring much of the world of a utterly
non-polluting source of energy that doesn't violate the NIMBY principle.

The problem is that the people operating the "status quo" are throwing
such a vast amount of money at the political system around the world
that you'll never see any significant change in energy policy...at least
probably not in our lifetime.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
We could also make DSLR camera bodies out of coal.

-Jim
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
> I think they perfected
> some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
> another look at
> this idea?
> -Rich
>
 
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Discussion Starter #4
On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 17:25:07 GMT, "jim smith" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>We could also make DSLR camera bodies out of coal.
>
>-Jim
><[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
>> I think they perfected
>> some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
>> another look at
>> this idea?
>> -Rich
>>

>

Sure, but don't wear white.... : 0 )
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #5
On 28 Jan 2006 15:52:02 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

>Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
>I think they perfected
>some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
>another look at
>this idea?
>-Rich

They lost the war and this is their revenge....: 0 )
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #6
[email protected] wrote:

> Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
> I think they perfected
> some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
> another look at
> this idea?
> -Rich
>


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fischer-Tropsch_process

check out the other links, references, as well... the current view is that
oil shale, for one, has been overhyped.

--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
 
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Discussion Starter #7
On 28 Jan 2006 15:52:02 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

>Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
>I think they perfected
>some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
>another look at
>this idea?
>-Rich



pollution ?
I seriously think there's more future in nuclear power. Modern plants
are very safe.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
On 28 Jan 2006 15:52:02 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

>Of using coal to produce artificial substitutes for gasoline and oil?
>I think they perfected
>some of it. The U.S. has decent coal deposits, maybe it's time to take
>another look at
>this idea?
>-Rich

For starters, one of the most air polluted nations in the world is
China. That's in the process of changing. When the Three Gorges Dam
project is completed, they will have 32 generators providing power
throughout the entire industrial region and more.... That means no
more coal or oil fueled factories, etc. And, if we ever need to take
them out, one dam breach and the flood downstream will sweep the land
clean of everything. Our air is bad. Some of us are old enough to
recall traveling across the country with out seeing an unending haze.
But, ours is nothing compared to China and eastern Europe.
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Spike <[email protected]> wrote:



> Our air is bad. Some of us are old enough to
> recall traveling across the country with out seeing an unending haze.
> But, ours is nothing compared to China and eastern Europe.
> --


And some of us are old enough to remember seeing a grimy black deposit
everywhere in any city visited... selective memory, Spike!

I am ALL in favor of the fluidized bed, pellet-fuel nuke... but you'll
never get the nanny-minded tree huggers to go along with that..

They truly ARE 'useful idiots'.


--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
 
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Discussion Starter #10
On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 12:21:54 GMT, Backyard Mechanic
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Spike <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>> Our air is bad. Some of us are old enough to
>> recall traveling across the country with out seeing an unending haze.
>> But, ours is nothing compared to China and eastern Europe.
>> --

>
>And some of us are old enough to remember seeing a grimy black deposit
>everywhere in any city visited... selective memory, Spike!
>
>I am ALL in favor of the fluidized bed, pellet-fuel nuke... but you'll
>never get the nanny-minded tree huggers to go along with that..
>
>They truly ARE 'useful idiots'.

No. It is not selective memory.

While that is quite true of many cities, from personal experience
traveling the nation and overseas, you tended to see far more of that
in the eastern states than in the west, just as you might see
comparing eastern Europe to North America, where hydroelectric is far
more prevalent.

Personally, I think it had much to do, not just with the vehicles, but
with the use of coal and diesel for heating, factories, etc. Those are
used far less in the western states.

And "back in the day" there was less thought to air pollution,
therefore less thought to proper maintenance of vehicles when they
began burning oil in large quantities, and exuding large clouds of
blue.

Even so, today, you can't drive across the nation (USA) without seeing
the haze, thicker in some areas than others, but there none the less.
Those clear star filled nights, and days of clear (clean) blue skies
is pretty much a thing of the past.

With all the effort to reduce emissions, that haze has increased.
Naturally, in part, because there are more vehicles on the road. But
they are supposed to be cleaner vehicles.

So, while you may consider it selective memory on my part, I think, on
your part, you have ignored certain aspects of life in past decades
with regard to socio-economic conditions relative to geographical
influences. : 0 )
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #11
On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 12:51:59 -0800, Spike <[email protected]> wrote:

>On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 12:21:54 GMT, Backyard Mechanic
><[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>Spike <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>> Our air is bad. Some of us are old enough to
>>> recall traveling across the country with out seeing an unending haze.
>>> But, ours is nothing compared to China and eastern Europe.
>>> --

>>
>>And some of us are old enough to remember seeing a grimy black deposit
>>everywhere in any city visited... selective memory, Spike!
>>
>>I am ALL in favor of the fluidized bed, pellet-fuel nuke... but you'll
>>never get the nanny-minded tree huggers to go along with that..
>>
>>They truly ARE 'useful idiots'.

>No. It is not selective memory.
>
>While that is quite true of many cities, from personal experience
>traveling the nation and overseas, you tended to see far more of that
>in the eastern states than in the west, just as you might see
>comparing eastern Europe to North America, where hydroelectric is far
>more prevalent.
>
>Personally, I think it had much to do, not just with the vehicles, but
>with the use of coal and diesel for heating, factories, etc. Those are
>used far less in the western states.
>
>And "back in the day" there was less thought to air pollution,
>therefore less thought to proper maintenance of vehicles when they
>began burning oil in large quantities, and exuding large clouds of
>blue.
>
>Even so, today, you can't drive across the nation (USA) without seeing
>the haze, thicker in some areas than others, but there none the less.
>Those clear star filled nights, and days of clear (clean) blue skies
>is pretty much a thing of the past.
>
>With all the effort to reduce emissions, that haze has increased.
>Naturally, in part, because there are more vehicles on the road. But
>they are supposed to be cleaner vehicles.
>
>So, while you may consider it selective memory on my part, I think, on
>your part, you have ignored certain aspects of life in past decades
>with regard to socio-economic conditions relative to geographical
>influences. : 0 )



Well, here in Phoenix it is not caused by emissions from cars. It is
particulates that cause the smog caused by: dust on road/land, dust
from diesel engines (semi's), lawnmowers, construction sites, etc
etc... I modern car engine is very clean.
 
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Discussion Starter #12

>
>
>Well, here in Phoenix it is not caused by emissions from cars. It is
>particulates that cause the smog caused by: dust on road/land, dust
>from diesel engines (semi's), lawnmowers, construction sites, etc
>etc... I modern car engine is very clean.

No dispute that modern engines are cleaner, but, the haze continues to
grow, yet there are far less "old" cars on the roads, far more "clean"
cars, etc. As for Phoenix, and Flagstaff and the rest, you also have
to acknowledge that the populations of such areas have greatly
increased. If cars burn cleaner by 25% for example, but the numbers of
cars have quadrupled, what is the end result? Surely, you don't think
it's going to be cleaner air.

The context of the discussion was my "selective memory" and forgetting
how dirty cities used to be long ago. My response was that while true
about the cities, one also has to take into account ALL the associated
factors, such as indicated in the preceding paragraph. The problems of
pollution are often over-simplified. For example, modern cars are
cleaner so it must be the trucks and lawnmowers, while neglecting to
take into account increased populations.

One cow may fart a cloud of methane with little impact upon the
environment. But one million cows farting methane will surely impact
the region in which they are concentrated, as well as drifting over
other regions.

When i moved to this rural area, smog was practically nil. The
population at the time was around 36,000. Most were ranchers and
farmers, and most were driving older vehicles. That was 1986, when the
sky was clear, stars were bright and you could see for miles. The
population is now in excess of 100,000. Most people drive pretty nice
modern cars. Yet, many days a year, we get smog alerts now, and there
is a perpetual haze. We have no factories, etc. I don't think we have
that many lawnmowers.
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Spike <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>>
>>
>>Well, here in Phoenix it is not caused by emissions from cars. It is
>>particulates that cause the smog caused by: dust on road/land, dust
>>from diesel engines (semi's), lawnmowers, construction sites, etc
>>etc... I modern car engine is very clean.

> No dispute that modern engines are cleaner, but, the haze continues to
> grow, yet there are far less "old" cars on the roads, far more "clean"
> cars, etc. As for Phoenix, and Flagstaff and the rest, you also have
> to acknowledge that the populations of such areas have greatly
> increased. If cars burn cleaner by 25% for example, but the numbers of
> cars have quadrupled, what is the end result? Surely, you don't think
> it's going to be cleaner air.
>
> The context of the discussion was my "selective memory" and forgetting
> how dirty cities used to be long ago. My response was that while true
> about the cities, one also has to take into account ALL the associated
> factors, such as indicated in the preceding paragraph. The problems of
> pollution are often over-simplified. For example, modern cars are
> cleaner so it must be the trucks and lawnmowers, while neglecting to
> take into account increased populations.
>
> One cow may fart a cloud of methane with little impact upon the
> environment. But one million cows farting methane will surely impact
> the region in which they are concentrated, as well as drifting over
> other regions.
>
> When i moved to this rural area, smog was practically nil. The
> population at the time was around 36,000. Most were ranchers and
> farmers, and most were driving older vehicles. That was 1986, when the
> sky was clear, stars were bright and you could see for miles. The
> population is now in excess of 100,000. Most people drive pretty nice
> modern cars. Yet, many days a year, we get smog alerts now, and there
> is a perpetual haze. We have no factories, etc. I don't think we have
> that many lawnmowers.
> --


Spike....

I dont think you got my drift. Certainly I feel the same as you do.

There has got to be MORE to it than popular/political science knows.'

There HAS NOT been enough increase in use to overcome the drastic
DECREASE of emissions.

Smog is MORE than just hydrocarbon reaction. Downtown cities used to
stink of car exhaust... it's notable that is no longer the case, yet the
readings increase.

Dayton Ohio is a place that should be studied. Hit hard by de-
manufacturing, factories reduced and closed and cleaned up, coal burning
power plants shut down. population stable or falling. reduced air
traffic both at the airport and AF base.

E-check mandated. Yet no real lowering of 'smog'readings. So E-check
discontinued... hmmm.






--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
 
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Discussion Starter #14
On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 03:46:42 GMT, Backyard Mechanic
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Spike <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Well, here in Phoenix it is not caused by emissions from cars. It is
>>>particulates that cause the smog caused by: dust on road/land, dust
>>>from diesel engines (semi's), lawnmowers, construction sites, etc
>>>etc... I modern car engine is very clean.

>> No dispute that modern engines are cleaner, but, the haze continues to
>> grow, yet there are far less "old" cars on the roads, far more "clean"
>> cars, etc. As for Phoenix, and Flagstaff and the rest, you also have
>> to acknowledge that the populations of such areas have greatly
>> increased. If cars burn cleaner by 25% for example, but the numbers of
>> cars have quadrupled, what is the end result? Surely, you don't think
>> it's going to be cleaner air.
>>
>> The context of the discussion was my "selective memory" and forgetting
>> how dirty cities used to be long ago. My response was that while true
>> about the cities, one also has to take into account ALL the associated
>> factors, such as indicated in the preceding paragraph. The problems of
>> pollution are often over-simplified. For example, modern cars are
>> cleaner so it must be the trucks and lawnmowers, while neglecting to


>
>Spike....
>
>I dont think you got my drift. Certainly I feel the same as you do.
>
>There has got to be MORE to it than popular/political science knows.'
>
>There HAS NOT been enough increase in use to overcome the drastic
>DECREASE of emissions.
>
>Smog is MORE than just hydrocarbon reaction. Downtown cities used to
>stink of car exhaust... it's notable that is no longer the case, yet the
>readings increase.
>
>Dayton Ohio is a place that should be studied. Hit hard by de-
>manufacturing, factories reduced and closed and cleaned up, coal burning
>power plants shut down. population stable or falling. reduced air
>traffic both at the airport and AF base.
>
>E-check mandated. Yet no real lowering of 'smog'readings. So E-check
>discontinued... hmmm.

Agreed. I know for us here in CA, those dam special low emission fuels
have been a problem. What they reduced on the one hand, they made up
for on the other. Add in that it ruined vehicle engines, especially
diesel, and ended up producing more of what it was supposed to
reduce.... in addition to adding the new stuff.

The areas like LA basin, and here where we have a very similar
topographical situation, smog has nowhere to go. Both areas have
sustained massive growth problems.

Isn't it Dayton that has the garbage fired power plant right along the
interstate? Or is that Columbus? Former in-laws all live back there,
and I recall my then bro-in-law pointing it out to us. Thought it was
on the trip to the Air Museum, but it was about 40 years ago.
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Spike <[email protected]> wrote:

>>> The problems of
>>> pollution are often over-simplified. For example, modern cars are
>>> cleaner so it must be the trucks and lawnmowers, while neglecting to

>
>>
>>Spike....
>>
>>I dont think you got my drift. Certainly I feel the same as you do.
>>
>>There has got to be MORE to it than popular/political science knows.'
>>
>>There HAS NOT been enough increase in use to overcome the drastic
>>DECREASE of emissions.
>>
>>Smog is MORE than just hydrocarbon reaction. Downtown cities used to
>>stink of car exhaust... it's notable that is no longer the case, yet
>>the readings increase.
>>
>>Dayton Ohio is a place that should be studied. Hit hard by de-
>>manufacturing, factories reduced and closed and cleaned up, coal
>>burning power plants shut down. population stable or falling.
>>reduced air traffic both at the airport and AF base.
>>
>>E-check mandated. Yet no real lowering of 'smog'readings. So E-check
>>discontinued... hmmm.


> Agreed. I know for us here in CA, those dam special low emission fuels
> have been a problem. What they reduced on the one hand, they made up
> for on the other. Add in that it ruined vehicle engines, especially
> diesel, and ended up producing more of what it was supposed to
> reduce.... in addition to adding the new stuff.
>
> The areas like LA basin, and here where we have a very similar
> topographical situation, smog has nowhere to go. Both areas have
> sustained massive growth problems.
>
> Isn't it Dayton that has the garbage fired power plant right along the
> interstate? Or is that Columbus? Former in-laws all live back there,
> and I recall my then bro-in-law pointing it out to us. Thought it was
> on the trip to the Air Museum, but it was about 40 years ago.
> --
>


Columbus had an operational plant..along I-71 south of city, only for a
few years. I believe Dayton's was a pilot plant, never went into mass
operation.


As you might guess, Dayton is also in a valley. Like I said, it's an
odd duck, the yellow haze is def. visible there... but not 20 miles to
the east west or north.

--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
 
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Discussion Starter #16
On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 00:40:35 GMT, Backyard Mechanic
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Spike <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>>> The problems of

SNIP
>>
>> Isn't it Dayton that has the garbage fired power plant right along the
>> interstate? Or is that Columbus? Former in-laws all live back there,
>> and I recall my then bro-in-law pointing it out to us. Thought it was
>> on the trip to the Air Museum, but it was about 40 years ago.
>> --
>>

>
>Columbus had an operational plant..along I-71 south of city, only for a
>few years. I believe Dayton's was a pilot plant, never went into mass
>operation.
>
>
>As you might guess, Dayton is also in a valley. Like I said, it's an
>odd duck, the yellow haze is def. visible there... but not 20 miles to
>the east west or north.

That's because everything blows down to Cincinnati where my ex
resides. And that drift might explain why so many of her family (both
parents, etc) have died of cancer.... although I'm told the reason for
that is some nuke storage place north of there that's been on the EPA
super fund list for decades.
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Spike <[email protected]> wrote:

> That's because everything blows down to Cincinnati where my ex
> resides. And that drift might explain why so many of her family (both
> parents, etc) have died of cancer.... although I'm told the reason for
> that is some nuke storage place north of there that's been on the EPA
> super fund list for decades.
> --
>


Uh, no it doesnt.. The westerlies still prevail, WHEN there is a wind..
Cinci, however, happens to be at the confluence of the Miami and Ohio River
valleys, thus a basin.

I suspect any such is as much due to eastward flow from Louisville, and
it's own emissions.

Plus... Dying of cancer is as much hereditary as anything else. We all die
of something... if I take from my mom's side, it'll be cancer.

If from my father's side, it'll be either heart, when long-lived, or
Alzheimers, if earlier.

--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
 
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Discussion Starter #18
On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 21:55:18 GMT, Backyard Mechanic
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Spike <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> That's because everything blows down to Cincinnati where my ex
>> resides. And that drift might explain why so many of her family (both
>> parents, etc) have died of cancer.... although I'm told the reason for
>> that is some nuke storage place north of there that's been on the EPA
>> super fund list for decades.
>> --
>>

>
>Uh, no it doesnt.. The westerlies still prevail, WHEN there is a wind..
>Cinci, however, happens to be at the confluence of the Miami and Ohio River
>valleys, thus a basin.
>
>I suspect any such is as much due to eastward flow from Louisville, and
>it's own emissions.
>
>Plus... Dying of cancer is as much hereditary as anything else. We all die
>of something... if I take from my mom's side, it'll be cancer.
>
>If from my father's side, it'll be either heart, when long-lived, or
>Alzheimers, if earlier.

Could be from Lewville, I guess. Not my part of the country. As I
recall it was a northwest air corridor which brought it down. My
former is from Newport, Ky, right across the river, and when her
mother died her dad came up with all these articles about the winds
carrying stuff from this nuke dump storage site, and that it also
leached into the groundwater system. I think he was considering some
sort of suit. Supposed to explain why the cancer death rate in
Cincinnati was considerably higher than most of the rest of the
country. That was her 2nd round of cancer (different types). And then
he was diagnosed and later died of it. And, yeah, we all die of
something... called life. It's terminal. Nearly every male will
develop prostate cancer before he dies. And the last time I was there
and saw the Miami R,and worse the Little Miami R, it looked like you
could walk across the sludge. I like it here. Crystal clear streams
and lakes, and blue rivers not brown. But, everyone has their own
preference as to what region they like best.
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Spike <[email protected]> wrote:

> Could be from Lewville, I guess. Not my part of the country. As I
> recall it was a northwest air corridor which brought it down. My
> former is from Newport, Ky, right across the river, and when her
> mother died her dad came up with all these articles about the winds
> carrying stuff from this nuke dump storage site, and that it also
> leached into the groundwater system. I think he was considering some
> sort of suit. Supposed to explain why the cancer death rate in
> Cincinnati was considerably higher than most of the rest of the
> country. That was her 2nd round of cancer (different types). And then
> he was diagnosed and later died of it. And, yeah, we all die of
> something... called life. It's terminal. Nearly every male will
> develop prostate cancer before he dies. And the last time I was there
> and saw the Miami R,and worse the Little Miami R, it looked like you
> could walk across the sludge. I like it here. Crystal clear streams
> and lakes, and blue rivers not brown. But, everyone has their own
> preference as to what region they like best.
> --


Miami valley is straight N-S

However, what you speak of is from the Miamisburg Mound Lab Superfund
site, 35 miles north up the Miami. Cleaned up for years, as I recall.

There's been some talk of high cancer incidence, locally and downstream,
but not much made of it lately

There's (or WAS) a Naval Ammunition depot in Crane IN, near Bloomington
which would be w-n-w of Cincy.. though I didnt hear of nukes being stored
there.

Nust have been SOME time ago... I spent some time, canoeing, on both
Miami R,and the Little Miami R over twenty years ago... though it was
further north than the confluence.

--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
 
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Discussion Starter #20
On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 14:50:26 GMT, Backyard Mechanic
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Spike <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Could be from Lewville, I guess. Not my part of the country. As I
>> recall it was a northwest air corridor which brought it down. My
>> former is from Newport, Ky, right across the river, and when her
>> mother died her dad came up with all these articles about the winds
>> carrying stuff from this nuke dump storage site, and that it also
>> leached into the groundwater system. I think he was considering some
>> sort of suit. Supposed to explain why the cancer death rate in
>> Cincinnati was considerably higher than most of the rest of the
>> country. That was her 2nd round of cancer (different types). And then
>> he was diagnosed and later died of it. And, yeah, we all die of
>> something... called life. It's terminal. Nearly every male will
>> develop prostate cancer before he dies. And the last time I was there
>> and saw the Miami R,and worse the Little Miami R, it looked like you
>> could walk across the sludge. I like it here. Crystal clear streams
>> and lakes, and blue rivers not brown. But, everyone has their own
>> preference as to what region they like best.
>> --

>
>Miami valley is straight N-S
>
>However, what you speak of is from the Miamisburg Mound Lab Superfund
>site, 35 miles north up the Miami. Cleaned up for years, as I recall.

Last I read, which wasn't all that long ago was that they were still
cleaning stuff as it percolates up or some such. Like Love Canal...
will it ever really be clean? And that aspect of powering vehicles is
a concern with nuclear. You might power a car, but what to do with the
waste product. Seems it would be just trading one pollution for
another.
>
>There's been some talk of high cancer incidence, locally and downstream,
>but not much made of it lately
>
>There's (or WAS) a Naval Ammunition depot in Crane IN, near Bloomington
>which would be w-n-w of Cincy.. though I didnt hear of nukes being stored
>there.

All the stuff my former fil showed me had to do with chemicals stored
in leaking drums and stuff about how they were trying to install
rubber liners...
>
>Nust have been SOME time ago... I spent some time, canoeing, on both
>Miami R,and the Little Miami R over twenty years ago... though it was
>further north than the confluence.

Last time I was down there was when I was in Peru, IN back in 1985,
and had to make trips down for court and child visitation. Didn't see
it when I went back following my son's death, but, the view we had
from the Hilton Hotel in downtown Cincinnati was disgusting. Hate to
say it about anyone's hometown, but the city looked filthy... although
the streets right around the courthouse were not too bad.
--

Spike
1965 Ford Mustang Fastback 2+2, Vintage Burgundy
w/Black Std Interior, A Code 289 C4 Trac-Lok;
Vintage 40 16" rims w/225/50ZR16 KDWS BF Goodrich
gForce Radial T/As, Cobra drop; surround sound
audio-video...
See my ride at....
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/003_May_21_3004.jpg
Feb 2004- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/005_May_21_2004.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/davescar_7_11_05_002.jpg
Jul 2005- http://207.36.208.198/albums/86810/Engine_rebuild_006.jpg
 
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